chafé

Portuguese | Brazilian Portuguese Brazil

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) A mix of the words "chá" and "café" ("tea" and "coffee", in English) used to refer to a very bad and weak coffee.

"Nossa, este café está muito aguado! Nunca mais tomo este chafé."

"Wow, this coffee is so watery! I'll never have this chafé again."





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0800

Portuguese Brazil

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some people

It comes from the possibility to call companies customer service in Brazil using the prefix 0800 without being charged for it.

"Vamos à festa na sexta-feira, a entrada vai ser 0800."

"Lets go to the party on Friday, the entrance will be for free."


Confirmed by 4 people




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Nem que a vaca tussa*

* Not even if the cow coughs

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

It's used when something is impossible to happen.

"Não ando nessa montanha russa nem que a vaca tussa!"

"I won’t ride this roller coaster, not even if the cow coughs!"


Confirmed by 5 people




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dia de São Nunca*

* the day of Saint Never

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

This expression is used when someone wants to refer to something impossible, improbable.

"Só voltaremos a ser campeões no dia de São Nunca!"

"We will only be champions again on the day of St. Never!"


Confirmed by 5 people




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dar pano pra manga*

* to give cloth for (making) sleeves

Portuguese Brazil

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Everyone

The expression is used when it seems like the situation can initiate a lengthy discussion or be matter for gossip. It is mainly used to refer to polemic, controversial or far-too-complex subjects.

"A separação daquele casal vai dar pano pra manga."

"The breakup of that couple is going to give cloth for sleeves."


Confirmed by 2 people




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tâ caindo o mundo

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED Very frequently BY Pretty much everyone

The expression, which in literal translation to english would be 'the world is falling', is used when there is really heavy rain

"Você já olhou lá fora? Tâ caindo o mundo!"

"Have you looked outside? The world is falling!"





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se a vida fosse fácil, se chamaria miojo*

* If life were easy, it would be called instant noodles

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

This expression is used to reinforce that life is hard.

"Está sendo bem difícil sobreviver a 2020. Pois é, se a vida fosse fácil se chamaria miojo!"

"It is being very difficult to survive 2020. Well, if life was easy it would be called instant noodles!"


Confirmed by 3 people




piá / guria de prédio*

* building boy / girl

Portuguese Curitiba, Brazil

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A spoiled boy (piá) or girl (guria) that doesn't join popular culture. Usually related to wealth, lives away from the street costumes, as in a building (prédio).

"Não sabe jogar bolinha de gude? Mas é um piá de prédio mesmo..."

"Don't you know how to play marbles? It could only be a building boy..."


Confirmed by 2 people




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piá

Portuguese Paraná, Brazil

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(n.) Meaning "boy" or "kid". From the indigenous Tingui language, it means "heart". Tingui mothers used to call their sons saying "heart", "my heart".

"Pare com isso, piá!"; "Piá, venha já pra dentro que tá frio aí fora!"

"Stop doing that, boy!"; "Hey, kid, come inside right now, it's cold outside!"


Confirmed by 3 people




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um mar de rosas*

* a sea of roses

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

Period or situation of tranquility, happiness, harmony. Without facing difficulties; comfortable; easy.

"A vida não é um mar de rosas" "O jogo foi um mar de rosas"

"Life is not a sea of roses" "The match was a sea of roses"


Confirmed by 5 people




🔰

Portuguese Brazil

Emoji USED On Occasion BY Far-right supporters

Originally a Japanese symbol for new drivers, it is used by Brazilian nationalists and far-right supporters because of its green and and yellow, the Brazilian national colors, and because of its resemblance to a military insignia.

"Sou brasileiro! 🔰"

"I'm Brazilian! 🔰"


Confirmed by 2 people




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onde o Judas perdeu as botas*

* where Judas lost his boots

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

When a place is way too far away.

"A fazenda dele fica onde o Judas perdeu as botas."

"His farm is where Judas lost his boots."


Confirmed by 3 people




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caô

Portuguese Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Word USED Frequently BY Young people

Used to say that something is a lie, when people are surprised or when something or someone will get in trouble.

"Não acredita nele, ele tá de caô." "Caô que você ganhou na loteria!" "Não faça isto, vai dar caô!"

"Don't believe him, he's lying to you." "I can't believe you won the lottery!" "Don't do it, you're gonna get in trouble!"


Confirmed by 4 people




coronga

Portuguese Brazil

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(n.) A much cooler name for the coronavirus. Also can be used in verb form. Corongar: to catch the coronavirus.

"O Trump pegou coronga."

"Trump caught the coronavirus."





enchendo os pacová*

* to fill the pacová

Portuguese Brazil

Expression USED Frequently BY Older Generations

To bore, annoy, or irritate someone.

"Você é muito irritante, para de encher os pacová!"

"You are so annoying, stop filling the pacová!"