fomo

English English speaking countries

Acronym USED Frequently BY Young People

Stands for Fear of Missing Out.

"I decided to stay in on Friday night but when I saw the pictures the next day I had major fomo."


Confirmed by 8 people




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byob

English English speaking countries

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Most People

Stands for Bring Your Own Beer/Booze. Often found on party invitations or restaurants to indicate that you are welcome to bring your own drinks with you.

"Can we stop at the shop on the way to the party? It's a BYOB kind of thing."


Confirmed by 11 people




sound

English North West England, United Kingdom

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) The word 'sound' has two uses and meanings in English slang. The first is as an adjective, to describe a person as cool and/or easy to get on with. The second is as an affirmation, like 'alright' or 'yes, of course'.

"Have you met Josh?" "Yeah, he's well sound." "Is it okay if we get there at about 8pm?" "Yeah, sound, no worries."


Confirmed by 6 people




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potato potato

English United States

Expression USED Frequently BY Some People

A barely noticeable or trivial difference, just like po-tay-to and po-tah-to.

“What did you have for lunch?” “Baked eggplant.” “Don’t you mean aubergine?” “Potato potato, what’s the difference?”


Confirmed by 9 people




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I can’t even

English United States

Expression USED Frequently BY Millenials

Expressing disbelief or incomprehension. Alternative to ‘wow’ or ‘no way’.

"I showed up an hour late to work, wearing the same outfit as yesterday, and I still got a promotion." "I can’t even with you."


Confirmed by 11 people




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kiff

English Cape Town and Durban, South Africa

Word USED Frequently BY Surfer types and Capetonians

(adj.) A colloquial alternative to cool - used to express enjoyment or status.

"He's a kiff oke."

"He's a cool guy."





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æ

'sitgoin

English Australia

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Australian English: informal, "how are you?". Abbreviation of "How is it going?"

" 'sitgoin Bob?" "Mate, my car's carked it." "Mate."

"How are you, Bob?" "My car has died." "I'm sorry."


Confirmed by 6 people




æ

alright?

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Frequently BY People from the south

Used as an informal greeting, or way of asking how someone is.

"Alright?" "Yeah, not bad, you?"


Confirmed by 2 people




scran

English England

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

Scran is an informal word for food. It doesn’t describe any particular type of food or any specific meal, it can be used at any time of the day.

“Oh I proper fancy some scran.”





to make a mountain out of a molehill

English English speaking countries

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

To make a mountain out of a molehill is to treat a minor problem as something major. Used when somebody is exaggerating.

“I was only 10 minutes late! You’re making a mountain out of a molehill.” “You’re making a mountain out a molehill, you failed one test, it doesn’t mean you’ll fail the whole year”





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noggin

English England

Word USED On Occasion BY Parents

Noggin is an informal word for ‘head’.

“Use your noggin”


Confirmed by 6 people




you make a better door than a window

English England

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

This phrase is used if somebody is blocking your view. It’s a way of asking somebody to move out of the way. Since your body is dense, nobody can see through it - hence it being compared to a door, rather than a window - something you can see through.

“You make a better door than a window” “Oops! Sorry, I’ll move out of the way”


Confirmed by 5 people




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ey up *

* hello

English Lancashire , England

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Commonly used as a greeting.

“Ey up! How’s things?”


Confirmed by 5 people




æ

cwtch

English Wales

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) A little hug or cuddle.

“Come for a cwtch, mam.“

“Come for a hug, mum.“


Confirmed by 5 people




syn

Ay up Duck

English Stoke On Trent, Staffordshire, United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Potters

A way to say hello. An informal greeting.

"Ay up Duck, how are ya?"