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baptism of fire

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Immediately having to cope with a stressful situation in order to improve.

"How was your first driving lesson?" "It was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed it."


Confirmed by 10 people




to throw someone in at the deep end

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."


Confirmed by 13 people




syn

il drache*

* it's pouring

French North of France, France

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used when it rains heavily.

"Il vaut mieux rester à l'intérieur vu qu'il drache dehors."

"It's better to stay inside since it's pouring outside."


Confirmed by 6 people




syn

spöregnar*

* crop raining

Swedish Sweden

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

(v.) When it is raining very hard or heavily.

"Det spöregnar just nu så vi borde nog stanna hemma."

"It’s crop raining outside right now so we should probably stay at home."





sataa kuin Esterin perseestä *

* rains like from Esther’s ass

Finnish Finland

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

When it is raining a lot. Nobody knows who Esther is.

"Jätin sateenvarjon kotiin ja matkalla junalle alkoi sataa kuin Esterin perseestä."

"I left the umbrella home and on the way to the train it started to rain like from Esther’s ass"





æ

trzymam kciuki*

* I hold thumbs

Polish Poland

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

In Poland, we hold our thumbs instead of crossing our fingers to wish somebody good luck.

"Jutro mam egzamin ustny." "W takim razie trzymam kciuki!"

"I have an oral exam tomorrow." "In that case, I hold fingers!"


Confirmed by 2 people




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alt

fit like?

Scots | Doric Aberdeenshire , Scotland

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

Used as a greeting, sometimes it means “how’s things?” And sometimes it just means hello!

"Fit like? Ach nae bad! Yersel?"

"How are things? Oh not bad! Yourself?"





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træde i spinaten*

* stepping into the spinach

Danish Denmark

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

When someone does something especially stupid which has a bad consequence. Like consistently getting to work late and then getting fired or forgetting to report your taxes on time and then getting a fine.

"Jeg har ikke fået klaret min skatterapport i tide, så jeg har fået en bøde" "Der trådte du virkelig i spinaten"

"I haven't gotten my tax report done in time, so I have gotten a fine" "You really stepped in the spinach there"





leuk is anders

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

An understatement used to make clear you aren't happy about the current situation.

"Door Corona moeten we allemaal binnenblijven. Belangrijk voor de volksgezondheid, maar leuk is anders."

"Because of Corona we all have to stay inside. Important for public health, but fun is different."


Confirmed by 2 people




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het is niet anders*

* it is not different

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used in a situation when nothing can be done but accept what is happening, similar to "it is what it is"

"Ik sta liever een halfuurtje later op, maar het is niet anders."

"I would rather get up a half our later, but it is not different."


Confirmed by 4 people




Of je worst lust!*

* Whether you like sausage!

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Friends

Phrase used when the person you're talking to did not hear what you said and is asking you to repeat. Often pronounced louder than necessary for added effect.

"Wat ga je morgen doen?" "Huh?" "Ik vroeg: wat ga je morgen doen?" "Wat?" "Of je worst lust!"

"What are you doing tomorrow?" "Huh?" "I asked - what are you doing tomorrow?" "What?" "Whether you like sausage!"


Confirmed by 4 people




divedhow*

* un-drunk

Cornish United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Sober. Composed of medhow (drunk) and di (un) meaning that Cornish people are either drunk or un-drunk.

“Res yw dhym eva Korev, re dhivedhow esov!”

“I gotta drink a beer, I'm too un-drunk!”





alt

tandsmør*

* tooth butter

Danish Denmark

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Butter spread so thick that you leave teeth marks in it when you take a bite.

"Jeg elsker hjemmelavet brød med tandsmør."

"I love homemade bread with a thick layer of butter."


Confirmed by 4 people




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alt

C'est quoi les bails?*

* What are the leases?

French France

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Young people

A way of saying 'what's up?'. Deriving from "bails" (leases) meaning "business". You are asking about the business your friend has done.

"Salut poto" "Wesh gros" "C'est quoi les bails" "Pas grand chose, on est là, toi-même tu sais"

"Hey bro" "Yo homie" "What's up?" "Not much, we represent, you know"


Confirmed by 8 people




æ

お疲れさまです。*

* hello/good job

Japanese Japan

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Mostly adults

It's a greeting phrase especially among co-workers and teammates. 疲れ is tiredness, and this phrase also acknowledges the other's hard work. You can just say 「お疲れさま。」to make it more casual.

「昨日5km走ったんだよ。」「お疲れさま。」

"I ran 5 km yesterday." "Good job."


Confirmed by 2 people