Diego

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED On Rare Occasion BY Street people

(n.) Used instead of saying “one 10”, which in Spanish is “un diez”, referring to a 10-peso coin.

“No tengo billetes, sólo un diego”.

“I don’t have any bills, only a diego.”





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baro

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) Pesos, the Mexican currency.

"Una noche en este hotel cuesta un buen baro."

"A night in this hotel costs a lot of money."





tirar la casa por la ventana *

* to throw the house out the window

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED Very frequently BY Adults

To spare no expense for something and therefore spend too much money on something. Especially used for celebrations e.g. birthdays or weddings.

"Ellos tiraron la casa por la ventana en su boda."

"They threw the house out the window at their wedding."


Confirmed by 4 people




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baiza

Spanish Mexico City, Mexico

Name USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(n.) Someone's hand.

''Me duele mi baiza." ''Vamos a rifarnos un tiro, puras baizas.''

''My hand hurts.'' ''Let's start a fight, hands only.''





mochar

Spanish Mexico

Word USED Very frequently BY Young People

To tear off, cut carelessly or amputate.

"¿Tienes alguna idea de cómo reducir la delincuencia?" "¡Tenemos que mocharle las manos a los ladrones!"

"Do you have any ideas on how to reduce crime?" "We have to cut off thieves hands!"


Confirmed by 5 people




cargar a manchis

Spanish West, Mexico

Expression USED Very frequently BY Young People

To carry someone on the back. Piggyback ride.

"Lucía se torció el tobillo y tuve que cargarla a manchis durante todo el recorrido por el museo."

"Lucía sprained her ankle and I had to carry her on my back for the entire tour of the museum."


Confirmed by 4 people




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No es enchílame esta *

* It's not enchiladas

Spanish Mexico

Reference USED On Rare Occasion BY Guetho

Life is not easy.

"No son enchiladas. Tendrás que aplicarte más."

"Those aren't enchiladas. You're gonna have to make an effort."





de cajón*

* of drawer

Spanish Mexico

Expression USED Very frequently BY Some People

Refers to something mandatory and completely necessary.

"Si quieres ser ingeniero, debes entender matemáticas, es de cajón."

"If you want to be an engineer, you must understand Maths, it is of drawer."


Confirmed by 4 people




🌚

Spanish Mexico

Emoji USED On Occasion BY Young People

It turns normal things into spicy or sexual.

"¿Qué vas a hacer hoy? 🌚"

"What are you going to do today? 🌚"


Confirmed by 4 people




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chido

Spanish Mexico City, Mexico

Expression USED Very frequently BY Young People and adults

It means that something’s cool.

"Untranslatable es una página muy chida."

"Untranslatable is a cool page."


Confirmed by 4 people




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papar moscas*

* blowing flies

Spanish Mexico

Expression USED Frequently BY Some People

Describes a person who is distracted and wasting time doing nothing.

"Pablo nunca hace nada en clase, se la pasa papando moscas."

"Pablo never does anything in class, he just keeps blowing flies."


Confirmed by 3 people




syn

estar chingón

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

"Chingón" means "good" in a very impolite and informal way, so you can only use it with your long-time friends.

"Ese carro está muy chingón."

"That car is fucking awesome."


Confirmed by 4 people




æ

pip-pip

Spanish Mexico

Sound USED Frequently BY Some People

Resembling the sound of a car horn, it is used to ask a person for permission to pass by when walking.

"El pasillo está muy lleno, vamos a llegar tarde a la clase." "Tú sígueme, yo abriré el camino. ¡Pip-pip!"

"The hall is very crowded, we are going to be late for class." "Follow me, I will lead the way. Pip-pip!"


Confirmed by 3 people




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qué pedo

Spanish Mexico

Expression USED Very frequently BY Young People

It's used usually to greet someone on a friendly, casual, carefree way. For all practical purposes it means "hey, there". It's used specially among young people but some adults use this as well. This expression may not be used in a serious formal conversation, because it could be considered rude or cheeky.

Note: It could be used when someone is angry.

"Qué pedo?! Cómo estás?" "Bien, aquí trabajando."

"Hey there! How are you?" "I'm fine, just working."


Confirmed by 6 people




qué onda*

* what wave

Spanish Mexico

Expression USED Very frequently BY Young People

Greetings, a way to say "what's up"

"¡Qué onda, Mateo! Mucho tiempo sin verte."

"What's up Mateo, long time without seeing you."


Confirmed by 6 people