syn

Du hesch doch nüm alli tassa im schrank!*

* You don’t have all your cups in your cupboard anymore!

German Switzerland

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

To ask if someone is serious, but implying that you think that their idea is crazy or dangerous.

"Du bisch im Gwitter go bada? Du hesch doch nüm alli Tassa im Schrank!"

"You went bathing in the middle of the thunderstorm? You don’t have all your cups in your cupboard anymore!"


Confirmed by 7 people




Hesch dini sieba sacha?*

* Do you have your seven things?

German Switzerland

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

To ask someone if they have all their belongings, so that you can get going.

"Hesch dini sieba sacha? Miar kömmen sus no ds spot!"

"Do you have your seven things? Otherwise we’ll be late!"


Confirmed by 6 people




heb dr latz*

* hold your apron

Swiss German Switzerland

Expression USED Frequently BY Young People

an offensive and rude way to tell someone to shut up

"Heb dr Latz, du hesch jo eh kai Ahnig vo was du redsch!"

"Hold your apron, you don’t know what you‘re talking about anyways!"





syn

es schifft*

* it ships

German | Baseldytsch Basel, Switzerland

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Meaning it is pouring rain.

"Ich chum nid, es schifft."

"I'm not coming, it is shipping."


Confirmed by 3 people




syn

alt

läss

German Switzerland

Word USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(adj.) Cool or great.

"Das isch so läss."

"That's so cool."





äxgüsi

German | Swiss German Switzerland

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

to say sorry or excuse me in a joking and informal way

"Äxgüsi, könnten sie miar helfa?"

"Excuse me, could you help me?"





spagnoletta*

* little female Spaniard

Italian Italy and Switzerland

Word USED On Occasion BY Lombards and Swiss people

(n.) It means "peanut".

"A Capodanno non possono mai mancare le spagnolette!"

"Peanuts can't ever miss for New Year's!"


Confirmed by 4 people




natel

Italian Switzerland

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(n.) This is what the Italian Swiss call their phones.

Note: The word was coined in 1975, when Switzerland introduced a mobile phone service for vehicles: Nationales Auto-TELefonnetz. They continued to develop the Swiss mobile network, and registered the word Natel as a trademark. It remained in use as a brand for the company's services until 2017. In Switzerland, "natel" is still used as a synonym for mobile phone across the country, but like many words with origins in a specific culture, it is unknown to Italian speakers outside of Switzerland.

"Ho dimenticato il natel a casa! E adesso come faccio a chiamare Lucia?"

"I forgot my phone at home! How will I call Lucy now?"


Confirmed by 4 people