on my Larry

English United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

Refers to someone who is a loner. Someone who has no friends.

"Please hurry up! I'm all on my Larry"





hatchings, matchings and despatchings

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

Births, weddings, and deaths.

"I only go to church for hatchings, matchings, and despatchings."





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a cock and bull story

English London, United Kingdom

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Londoners

It means a long-winded story that is nonsense. The literal translation of the expression is from cock or rooster to donkey/ass.

"Some men’s whole delight is to talk of a Cock and Bull over a pot." (the earliest example in print: The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton,1621)





innit

English United Kingdom

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

(interj.) Contraction of the phrase "isn't it?". Used to express agreement and confirm something someone else has said.

"It's so cold today." "Innit."


Confirmed by 12 people




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It’s chucking it down

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used for very heavy rain, or rain that has come on very suddenly.

“Would you look at the rain? It’s chucking it down now!”





Siling it down

English | Yorkshire Yorkshire, United Kingdom

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Just a local way in Yorkshire and the North East of England to talk about heavy rainfall.

It's siling it down out there.





sound

English North West England, United Kingdom

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) The word 'sound' has two uses and meanings in English slang. The first is as an adjective, to describe a person as cool and/or easy to get on with. The second is as an affirmation, like 'alright' or 'yes, of course'.

"Have you met Josh?" "Yeah, he's well sound." "Is it okay if we get there at about 8pm?" "Yeah, sound, no worries."


Confirmed by 6 people




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It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's

English United Kingdom

Idiom USED Frequently BY Older Generations

When dark clouds appear on the horizon, signalling that it's about to rain. The "Bill" in question is usually said to be William Shakespeare, but sometimes Kaiser Wilhelm.

"It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's... I bet it'll rain."





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round the Wrekin

English Midlands, United Kingdom

Expression USED Frequently BY older Midlanders

Slang for going the long way around, based on "the Wrekin", a large hill in east Shropshire, England.

"Sorry I'm late. I got on the wrong bus and it took me round the Wrekin!"





divedhow*

* un-drunk

Cornish United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Sober. Composed of medhow (drunk) and di (un) meaning that Cornish people are either drunk or un-drunk.

“Res yw dhym eva Korev, re dhivedhow esov!”

“I gotta drink a beer, I'm too un-drunk!”





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#ClapForCarers

English United Kingdom

Hashtag USED In the past BY Most People

Hashtag used to express gratitude for NHS workers during the coronavirus pandemic. Refers to the act of clapping outside your house at 8pm on a Thursday night.

"A special #ClapForCarers will take place at 5pm today as we say happy birthday to our precious NHS."


Confirmed by 10 people




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Oright?*

* Are you alright?

English United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

A common and informal way to greet someone.

"Oright mate, how's it going?" "Yeah, not too bad, thanks."


Confirmed by 8 people




the Mrs

English United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) Used by men to refer to their partner. Does not necessarily mean they are married.

"Want to go for a beer tonight?" "I can't, I'm staying in with the Mrs."


Confirmed by 10 people




got the morbs

English United Kingdom

Expression USED In the past BY Victorians in the 1880's

Used to describe temporary melancholia, coined from the word "morbid".

"I've got the morbs walking around this cemetery."


Confirmed by 2 people




famous last words

English United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

An ironic comment on an overconfident assertion that may later be proved wrong.

"I'll be perfectly fine going on my own!" "Famous last words!"


Confirmed by 9 people