to throw someone in at the deep end

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."


Confirmed by 13 people




stan

English English speaking countries

Word USED Frequently BY Gen Z'ers

Can be used as a noun or a verb to describe an obsessive love of a celebrity. Used frequently on Twitter. Originates from Eminem's song 'Stan', which tells the story of one of his obsessive fans.

"She really stans BTS." "She's a big Taylor Swift stan."


Confirmed by 4 people




laburar

Spanish Argentina

Word USED Frequently BY Some people

Used for the verb "to work" in the Lunfardo, which is an argot originated and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the lower classes in Buenos Aires and from there spread to other cities nearby, such as the surrounding area Greater Buenos Aires, Rosario and Montevideo.

"Mañana tengo que laburar."

"Tomorrow I have to work."


Confirmed by 11 people




syn

nietwaar*

* nottrue

Dutch Netherlands

Word USED Frequently BY many people

Used at the end of a sentence to ask for confirmation, like the English use of "right".

"Het is lekker weer vandaag, nietwaar?"

"The weather is great today, nottrue?"


Confirmed by 8 people




ngl

English Various countries

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Young people

Stands for "not gonna lie" and is used before a statement that might be perceived as strange, or too honest. As an acronym, it's mostly used online.

"What do you think of my painting?" "ngl, it's not your best."


Confirmed by 22 people




double-double

English Canada

Slang USED Frequently BY Canadians

(n.) Common way to drink coffee in Canada. 2 milk and 2 sugar.

“Hi, can I order a double-double please?”





main kayu tiga*

* playing three sticks

Malay Various countries

Expression USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

This expression is used to refer to someone who has an affair outside of their marriage.

"Kamu tak dengar berita ke? Syed tu tengah main kayu tiga dengan bosnya!"

"Haven't you heard the news? Syed is playing three sticks with his boss!"





#donedakwah*

* #donespreading (the message)

Malay Malaysia

Hashtag USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

Used when someone makes a sarcastic response to a situation, especially if it involves good/bad actions. Originated from Arabic da'wah, meaning to invite/to call upon - specifically, to preach about the Islamic faith.

"Bersangka baiklah. Mungkin diorang menunjuk-nunjuk sedekah sebab diorang nak membuktikan yang diorang baik. #donedakwah"

"Assume the best. Maybe they show off their donation because they want to prove that they're nice #donedakwah"





voor hetzelfde geld*

* for the same money

Dutch Netherlands

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

When a different outcome would have been just as likely.

"We hadden er gelukkig lekker weer bij, maar voor hetzelfde geld had het geregend op onze trouwdag."

"Luckily we had good weather, but for the same money it would have rained on our wedding day."





SNAFU

English United States

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Military

An acronym that is widely used to stand for the sarcastic expression 'Situation Normal: All Fucked Up'. It is a well-known example of military acronym slang. It means that the situation is bad, but that this is a normal state of affairs. The acronym is believed to have originated in the United States Marine Corps during World War II.

"What's the current situation in there?" "It's a real SNAFU. Everything is literally on fire." "So, same as usual."


Confirmed by 2 people




to drink the Kool-Aid

English United States

Reference USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

When someone has been persuaded to join a cause due to peer pressure. Meaning a persuasive personality has gotten you to believe in their cause. Usually has a negative connotation. This is a reference to the Jonestown mass suicide of 1978 when a cult leader mixed cyanide in Kool-Aid and had his followers drink it.

“Did you see Sue today?” “Yeah, she really drank the Kool-aid didn’t she?”


Confirmed by 2 people




pop

English United States

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) A sparkling drink.

"What pop would you like, ma'am?" "A root beer, please."


Confirmed by 2 people




syn

the Rona

English Australia

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) Aussies often refer to coronavirus as the Rona, or just Rona. We abbreviate/shorten so many words, guess it's not a surprise we've shortened this too.

"Steve caught The Rona when he went overseas so now he's in isolation for two weeks".


Confirmed by 2 people




syn

ga?

German Carinthia, Austria

Interjection USED Frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) Can be used at the end or in the middle of sentences as well as on its own. Its usage at the end of a sentence usually (but not always) implies that your dialogue partner expects you to either approve or reject what was just said whereas on its own, it expresses approval towards a statement.

"Der Umzug war anstrengend, ga?"

"The move was exhausting, wasn't it?"





alt

Schadenfreude*

* Damage-happiness

German Germany

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(n.) A feeling of happines that someone gets when others fail or things go wrong.

Note: It appears as a noun and an adjective (schandenfroh).

"Hast du gehört? Herr Müller hat schon wieder verschlafen." "Du bist ja richtig schadenfroh!"

"Did you head? Mr. Müller overslept again." "You’re really 'damage-happy'!"


Confirmed by 2 people