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a little birdie told me

English English speaking countries

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some people

This idiom is used playfully not to reveal the source of information about something. Usually, however, the source of the information is obvious. Sometimes rendered as 'A little bird told me'

"How did you know it was my birthday?" "Let's just say a little birdie told me!"


Confirmed by 17 people




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buy-cott

English English speaking countries

Word USED On Rare Occasion BY People Opposing Protests

(n.) Going out of your way to buy from a certain brand that has been boycotted.

“I’ve been buying a lot of t-shirts as part of a buy-cott to save a local business from going under”





got the morbs

English United Kingdom

Expression USED In the past BY Victorians in the 1880's

Used to describe temporary melancholia, coined from the word "morbid".

"I've got the morbs walking around this cemetery."





the Mrs

English United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) Used by men to refer to their partner. Does not necessarily mean they are married.

"Want to go for a beer tonight?" "I can't, I'm staying in with the Mrs."





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bagsy

English United Kingdom

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) To claim something for yourself, reserving it so someone else can't take it.

"Bagsy front seat!" "Don't take the last slice of cake, I've bagsy'd it."





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Oright?*

* Are you alright?

English United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

A common and informal way to greet someone.

"Oright mate, how's it going?" "Yeah, not too bad, thanks."





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How do?

English Northern England, United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

Greeting often used between walkers as they pass each other on a hike. It doesn't really mean anything but it an expression of friendliness that does not require an actual answer.

"How do?" "How do?"





baccy

English Northern England, United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) Shortened word for 'tobacco'.

"I'm rolling a cigarette, can I use your baccy?"





leg it

English United Kingdom

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(v.) To run very fast.

"I forgot my keys so I legged it back to my house."





quid

English United Kingdom

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(n.) The British pound.

"Can you lend me two quid for some chewing gum?"





skive

English United Kingdom

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) To play truant, meaning to not go in to work or school when you are supposed to.

"Let's skive maths this afternoon, I haven't done the homework."





spend a penny

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

Euphemism meaning "to go to the bathroom", originating from a time when public toilets charged one penny. It is used mostly by women, as men's urinals were free to use.

"I'll be back in a minute, just going to spend a penny."





In the street

English New York, United States

Slang USED Very frequently BY ex inmates

It's slang for "in the free world", "out of prison".

"Now that I've been in the street for 7 years, I've accomplished many things."





bun

English Southern England, United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

(v.) Used when displaying a displeasure to a certain idea or thought.

"Do you want to go to the gym later?" "Nah, bun that!"


Confirmed by 2 people




mugged off

English Essex, United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

To be played for a fool or rejected (romantically).

"Are you still dating that girl?" "Nah, I've been mugged off."


Confirmed by 2 people