bouche-trou*

* hole-filler

French French speaking countries

Word USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) It describes a person used as a replacement of another person in a group.

"Elle a parfois l'impression d'être le bouche-trou de la bande ; elle est invitée à manger ou faire la fête avec eux seulement quand ça les arrangent."

"She sometimes has the feeling of being the group hole-filler; she's invited to eat or party with them only when it suits them."





alt

saigner des yeux*

* to bleed from the eyes

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used when you see or hear something very unpleasant.

Note: saigner des oreilles (example): "Quant à moi, je saigne des oreilles dès que cette chanteuse passe à la radio." "As for me, I bleed from the ears as soon as this singer is aired on radio."

"Je saigne des yeux à chaque fois que je lis ses messages : il fait tellement de fautes d'orthographes!"

"I bleed from the eyes whenever I read his messages: he does so many spelling mistakes!"





donner sa langue au chat*

* give one's tongue to the cat

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Indicates that you don't have the answer to a question or don't want to try to guess it anymore.

" - M. & Mme Gator ont un fils, comment s'appelle-t-il ? - Je donne ma langue au chat !"

" - Mr & Mrs Gator have a son, what is his name? - I give my tongue to the cat."





syn

la semaine des quatre jeudis*

* the week of the four Thursdays

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

Used to express that something will never happen. In the past, Thursday was a break day for pupils and teachers. So, having a week with four Thursdays would have been a wonderful dream, but it will never happen.

" - Quand vas-tu me présenter à tes parents? - La semaine des quatre jeudis."

" - When will you introduce me to your parents? - On the week of the four Thursdays."





balles

French France

Name USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) Slang term for euros. Very old slang word (19th) that used to designate a Franc. The term suffered a decline in use after the changeover to the euro before being used frequently again.

"T’as pas dix balles ?"

"Do you have ten euros ?"





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prendre la poudre d'escampette

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Adults

To run away, to flee.

Note: This expression is old-fashioned.

"Hier, ma maison a été cambriolée, et au moment où je cherchais les voleurs, ils avaient déjà pris la poudre d'escampette."

"Yesterday, my house was robbed, and when I looked for the thieves, they had already fled."





voilà voilà

French French speaking countries

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Most People

When you finish telling something that might be awkward, sad or another quite negative feeling, you often end the story with "voilà voilà". The use and tone is different from the enthusiastic "voilà!".

"Hier, je marchais dans la rue tout en buvant mon café, et j'ai glissé sur une peau de banane. Je suis tombé et j'ai renversé mon café très chaud sur moi. Malheureusement, la rue était bondée, donc tout le monde m'a vu tomber. Voilà voilà..."

"Yesterday, I was walking down the street while drinking my coffee, and I slipped on a banana peel. I fell and spilled my very hot coffee on myself. Unfortunately, the street was crowded, so everyone saw me falling. So there you go..."





bcp

French France

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Young People

An abbreviation of "beaucoup", meaning "a lot", "much", or "many", used in texting or messaging.

"Il fait bcp trop chaud pour dormir"

"It is much too hot to sleep"


Confirmed by 5 people




La vie n’est pas un long fleuve tranquille*

* Life is not a long calm river

French France

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Older Generations

To explain that life is not always easy.

"Tu sais, la vie n’est pas un long fleuve tranquille."

"You know, life isn't a long calm river."


Confirmed by 6 people




Ce n’est pas de la tarte*

* It's not a tart

French French speaking countries

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

Used to say that something is not easy to do.

"Ce n’est pas de la tarte ce jeu!"

"This game is not easy!"


Confirmed by 7 people




prendre quelqu'un pour un lapin de six semaines*

* to take someone for a bunny of six weeks

French France

Expression USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

Often used after someone gives you information you don’t believe to be true. You feel that someone is taking you for an idiot.

"J’ai été au marché de matin et j’ai croisé Lucie, elle a demandé de tes nouvelles!" "Très drôle, mais ne me prends pas pour un lapin de 6 semaines!"

"I went to the market this morning and I saw Lucy, she asked about you!" "Really funny, but don’t take me for a bunny of 6 weeks!"





æ

lourd*

* heavy

French France

Word USED Frequently BY youngsters and former teens

(adj.) Cool or awesome. Can be used alone to succinctly express approval.

"Je me suis acheté une nouvelle paire de pompes, elles sont confortables et stylées." "Lourd."

"I just bought a new pair of shoes, they're comfy and classy." "Cool."





syn

stylé*

* stylish

French French speaking countries

Word USED Frequently BY Young People

(adj.) Used to say something's cool.

"Stylée ta nouvelle caisse !"

"Stylish, your new car!"


Confirmed by 5 people




syn

alt

avoir les boules *

* to have the balls

French French speaking countries

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

Used to say you're pissed off.

"J'ai vraiment les boules qu'il m'ai menti!"

"I'm really pissed that he lied to me."


Confirmed by 6 people




syn

alt

boulot

French French speaking countries

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(n.) Job or work.

"Tu as fait du bon boulot!"

"You did a good job!"


Confirmed by 2 people