æ

shute

Spanish Guatemala

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(adj.) Being nosey.

"¡No leas mis mensajes, qué shute eres!"

"Don't read my messages, how nosey you are!"





alt

uña y mugre*

* nail and dirt

Spanish Spanish speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

Inseparable, just like a nail and the dirt underneath.

"Esos dos son uña y mugre: van juntos a todos lados."

"These two are nail and dirt - they go everywhere together."





syn

la neta*

* the truth

Spanish Mexico

Word USED On Occasion BY Everyone

(n.) A more colloquial word that used to mean "the truth," and when used, emphasizes the truthfulness of what was said.

“¿neta wey?”

“for real?“


Confirmed by 5 people




al pedo*

* to the fart

Spanish Argentina

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

When you do something for nothing.

"Me puse a estudiar al pedo."

"I studied to the fart."


Confirmed by 7 people




más sabe el diablo por viejo que por diablo*

* more knows the devil for being an old guy than for being the devil

Spanish Spanish speaking countries

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Everyone

This phrase means that a person is more knowledgeable in life because they are more experienced due to their age, and not for their degree or status.

"Hazle caso a tu papá ya que más sabe el diablo por viejo que por diablo."

"Listen to your dad because more knows the devil for being an old guy than for being the devil."


Confirmed by 6 people




como Pedro por su casa*

* like Peter for his house

Spanish Honduras

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Mainly older adults

Used when someone is acting all casual as you would at your house, even though it might be inappropriate to act that way.

"Hay mucha gente en las calles como Pedro por su casa, parece que se les olvidó que estamos en cuarentena."

"There are so many people on the streets like Peter for his house. Seems like they forgot we are in quarantine."


Confirmed by 3 people




syn

chao pescao*

* goodbye fish

Spanish Spanish speaking countries

Slang USED Frequently BY Young people

Similar to the English "see you later alligator", it's a colloquial expression used with friends to say goodbye in a funny, rhyming way.

"Nos vemos el martes, ¡chao pescao!"

"See you on Tuesday, goodbye fish!"


Confirmed by 7 people




syn

en el quinto pino*

* in the fifth pine

Spanish Spain

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

When something is too far away.

"Vives en el quinto pino."

"You live in the fifth pine."


Confirmed by 6 people




syn

alt

Qué sopa?

Spanish Panama

Slang USED Frequently BY young people

Used as "what's up?" in Panamanian Spanish. It comes from switching the order in which syllables of "Que pasó?" (what happened). It is occasionally also written as "xopa".

"Oye fren, que sopa?"

"Hey bro, what's up?"


Confirmed by 2 people




syn

æ

fren

Spanish Panama

Slang USED Frequently BY Young people

(n.) Derives from the English word "friend" and is used as an informal way of referring to a friend.

"Oye fren, ¿qué sopa?"

"Hey bro, what's up?"


Confirmed by 2 people




syn

ser pan comido*

* to be eaten bread

Spanish Spain

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Everyone

Used to say when something (task, problem) can be easily solved.

"Elena es buena con los números. Para ella, resolver problemas de matemáticas es pan comido."

"Elena is good with numbers. For her, solving math problems is eaten bread."


Confirmed by 12 people




chavos

Spanish Puerto Rico

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(n.) Money.

"Necesito chavos pa' comprar ese anillo."

"I need money to buy that ring."


Confirmed by 6 people




flipar

Spanish Spain

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

When something amazes you; to flip out about something.

"Oye, tío. Acabo de hallar cien pavos en la calle." "¡Hala! Me flipo."

"Hey, man. I just found a hundred bucks in the street." "No way! I'm flipping out."


Confirmed by 16 people




laburar

Spanish Argentina

Word USED Frequently BY Some people

Used for the verb "to work" in the Lunfardo, which is an argot originated and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the lower classes in Buenos Aires and from there spread to other cities nearby, such as the surrounding area Greater Buenos Aires, Rosario and Montevideo.

"Mañana tengo que laburar."

"Tomorrow I have to work."


Confirmed by 10 people




gonorrea*

* gonorrhea

Spanish Colombia

Word USED Very frequently BY Most People

It can be used to: 1) demean someone, 2) friendly call someone, 3) describe something really bad or really good, 4) talk about someone who's really mean 5) compliment someone who's really good at what they do, and 6) describe surprise.

"1) Ese man es una gonorrea (Ofensa); 2) Vamos a la casa de esa gonorrea (Amistoso). 3) El arroz estaba una gonorrea (adjetivo negativo); Ese partido estuvo una gonorrea (adjetivo positivo); 4) Él toca una gonorrea (halago); 5) ¿En serio se murió? Que gonorrea.

"1) That man is a gonorrhea (Offensive); 2) Let's go to that gonorrhea's house (Friendly); 3) The rice was a gonorrhea (negative adjective); The match was gonorrhea. (positive adjective); 4) He plays gonorrhea (compliment); 5) Did he really die? What a gonorrhea. (Surprise)