hangry

English English speaking countries

Portmanteau USED On Occasion BY Most People

(adj.) To be angry or irritated because of hunger.

"Can you hurry up? I'm starting to get hangry."


Confirmed by 13 people




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baptism of fire

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Immediately having to cope with a stressful situation in order to improve.

"How was your first driving lesson?" "It was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed it."


Confirmed by 10 people




to throw someone in at the deep end

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."


Confirmed by 13 people




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the Rona

English Australia

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) Aussies often refer to coronavirus as the Rona, or just Rona. We abbreviate/shorten so many words, guess it's not a surprise we've shortened this too.

"Steve caught The Rona when he went overseas so now he's in isolation for two weeks".


Confirmed by 2 people




bobo

French Paris, France

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) A shortened version of the word 'bourgeois-bohème', meaning a middle-class person with money and liberal, left-wing political views. They are often seen as trendy and intellectual, but in a way that is performative. It is often said in a derogatory way.

"Le nouveau restaurant végan va attirer les bobos."

"The new vegan restaurant will attract the bobos."


Confirmed by 4 people




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barrer

French Poitou-Charentes, Normandy, France

Word USED Very frequently BY Most people

(v.) To lock a door. It comes from the time you used a bar to keep a door closed.

"T'as barré la porte ?"

"Did you lock the door?"





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servus

German | Austrian Austria

Interjection USED Frequently BY Most People

(interj.) It is a way of saying hello and/or bye that's only used in informal settings (e.g. with friends or family).

"Servus! Wie geht's? Lange nicht mehr gesehen!"

"Hi! How are you? Long time no see!"


Confirmed by 3 people




Gesichtsverschönerung*

* face beautifier

German Germany

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(n.) Used ironically during the coronavirus pandemic to express that wearing the face mask makes us look more beautiful ("face beautifier"). In Germany it is illegal to use the official name (Mund-Nasen-Schutz = mouth-nose-protection, only to use for professional and certified medical products) for our homemade masks (especially when they are sold to others). So we created some other funny names for it.

"Einen Moment, bitte, ich muss erst meine Gesichtsverschönerung anziehen."

"One second, please, I need to put on my face beautifier first."





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ey up

English Lancashire , England

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Commonly used as a greeting.

“Ey up! How’s things?”


Confirmed by 5 people




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sa brura*

* said the bride

Norwegian Norway

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

The Norwegian equivalent of "that's what she said".

"Jøss, den var større enn jeg trodde." "Sa brura!"

"Wow, it's bigger than I thought." "Said the bride!"





allergic

English Cork, Ireland

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

(adj.) Being allergic means not wanting to do a thing or disliking an activity.

"I'm supposed to paint the fence, and I'm allergic."


Confirmed by 3 people




es regnet Bindfäden*

* it's raining strings

German | Schnürlesregen (Swabian) Germany

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

Used to refer to constant pouring rain, so strong that you can't see separate droplets anymore.

"Nimm einen Schirm mit, es regnet heute Bindfäden."

"Take an umbrella with you, it's raining strings today."


Confirmed by 3 people




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It’s chucking it down

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used for very heavy rain, or rain that has come on very suddenly.

“Would you look at the rain? It’s chucking it down now!”





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frisje*

* little fresh

Dutch Netherlands

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) A combination of the Dutch word for soda, "frisdrank" (freshdrink), and the Dutch national pastime of using words in their diminutive form. It's a way of asking for a soda, without specifying which one you actually want. This is usually followed by a brief discussion where the person asking for the "little fresh" is still forced to make a decision about which soda they actually would like to have.

"Kan ik iets te drinken inschenken?" "Ja, doe mij maar een frisje." "Oké, we hebben cola, fanta, rivella..." "Doe maar cola."

"Can I pour you something to drink?" "Yes, you can do me a little fresh." "Okay, we have coke, fanta, rivella..." "Do me a coke then."


Confirmed by 2 people




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Å skjære alle over én kam*

* To cut everyone with the same comb

Norwegian Norway

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

To judge, evalue or treat all people in a group the same way without taking any (individual) differences into account.

"Svensker er ubrukelige til å gå på ski." "Nå må du ikke skjære alle over én kam."

"Swedes are useless at skiing." "You shouldn't cut everyone with the same comb."