alapozni*

* to lay a foundation

Hungarian Hungary

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

(v.) Its original meaning is "to lay a foundation", young people use it to say "pre-drink". It makes sense: at predrinks, you literally lay the foundation of the party that comes after.

"A koncert előtt elmegyünk egy haveromhoz alapozni."

"We are going to a buddy of mine's place to lay a foundation before the concert."





lóve

Slovak East Slovakia, Slovakia

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(n.) Means 'money', most likely originates from gypsy language.

"Máš nejaké lóve?"

"Do you have any money?"


Confirmed by 2 people




Diego

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED On Rare Occasion BY Street people

(n.) Used instead of saying “one 10”, which in Spanish is “un diez”, referring to a 10-peso coin.

“No tengo billetes, sólo un diego”.

“I don’t have any bills, only a diego.”





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pare

Serbian Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Montenegro

Slang USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) Informal way of saying "money". More formal way would be "novac".

"Pare ljude kvare."

"Money spoils people."





æ

pisto

Spanish Guatemala

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

It's money, either bills, coins, cents, any denomination.

"¡Tienes pisto va! "

"You have money, don't you?"





a grand

English England

Slang USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) A generally informal word meaning £1000

"I wouldn't mind a spare couple grand to spend on a holiday."

"I wouldn't mind a spare couple thousand pounds to spend on a holiday."


Confirmed by 8 people




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moolah

English England, English speaking countries

Slang USED Frequently BY Quite common, a lot originate from cockney rhyming slang

Expressions related to money used in England: *a quid (a pound) *lady godiva/deep sea diver(£5) *a pony (£25) *a ton (£100) *a monkey (£500) *a grand (£1000)

Note: a quid (a pound), lady godiva/deep sea diver(£5), a pony (£25), a ton (£100), a monkey (£500),a grand (£1000)

"Give us the moolah!"

"Give us the money!"


Confirmed by 2 people




minted

English United Kingdom

Slang USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

Meant in jest, to say that someone is so rich they could print their own money.

"They're absolutely minted!"


Confirmed by 3 people




bishusha

Spanish Argentina

Slang USED On Occasion BY People who has been in jail

(n.) Money

"Me quedé sin bishusha."

"I ran out of money."


Confirmed by 5 people




hajs

Polish Poland

Slang USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) Money.

„Nadal wisisz mi ten hajs. Kiedy mi go oddasz?”

„You still owe me that money. When are you going to give it back to me?”


Confirmed by 2 people




tirar la casa por la ventana *

* to throw the house out the window

Spanish Mexico

Slang USED Very frequently BY Adults

To spare no expense for something and therefore spend too much money on something. Especially used for celebrations e.g. birthdays or weddings.

"Ellos tiraron la casa por la ventana en su boda."

"They threw the house out the window at their wedding."


Confirmed by 4 people




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æ

lucas

Spanish Colombia

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(n.) "Lucas", alternatively spelled as "Lukas", is a local and informal way of referring to currency, more specifically the Colombian peso. It almost always omits the "thousand" particle since the Colombian peso is very devaluated, the "X thousand pesos" is implicit when saying "X lucas". Also related to: "Palo", a slang referring to a million of Colombian pesos.

"Una pola cuesta 2 lucas."

''A beer costs 2000 lucas.''


Confirmed by 2 people




moula

French France

Slang USED Frequently BY Teens

(n.) One of the many slang words used to mean "money". This word is actually used in English as well to mean the same thing (moolah).

"Hé mec, t'as d'la moula?"

"Yo bro, got any money?"


Confirmed by 6 people




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thune

French French speaking countries

Slang USED Frequently BY Teens

(n.) One of the many slang words used to mean "money"

"Hé mec, t'as d'la thune?"

"Yo bro, you got any cash?"


Confirmed by 5 people




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Tschö mit ö

German Germany

Slang USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

Another term for goodbye.

"Auf Wiedersehen!" "Tschö mit ö"

"Goodbye!" "Goodbye"


Confirmed by 2 people