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barrer

French Poitou-Charentes, Normandy, France

Word USED Very frequently BY Most people

(v.) To lock a door. It comes from the time you used a bar to keep a door closed.

"T'as barré la porte ?"

"Did you lock the door?"


Confirmed by 2 people




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It’s chucking it down

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used for very heavy rain, or rain that has come on very suddenly.

“Would you look at the rain? It’s chucking it down now!”


Confirmed by 4 people




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frisje*

* little fresh

Dutch Netherlands

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) A combination of the Dutch word for soda, "frisdrank" (freshdrink), and the Dutch national pastime of using words in their diminutive form. It's a way of asking for a soda, without specifying which one you actually want. This is usually followed by a brief discussion where the person asking for the "little fresh" is still forced to make a decision about which soda they actually would like to have.

"Kan ik iets te drinken inschenken?" "Ja, doe mij maar een frisje." "Oké, we hebben cola, fanta, rivella..." "Doe maar cola."

"Can I pour you something to drink?" "Yes, you can do me a little fresh." "Okay, we have coke, fanta, rivella..." "Do me a coke then."


Confirmed by 2 people




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Å skjære alle over én kam*

* To cut everyone with the same comb

Norwegian Norway

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

To judge, evalue or treat all people in a group the same way without taking any (individual) differences into account.

"Svensker er ubrukelige til å gå på ski." "Nå må du ikke skjære alle over én kam."

"Swedes are useless at skiing." "You shouldn't cut everyone with the same comb."


Confirmed by 2 people




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sa brura*

* said the bride

Norwegian Norway

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

The Norwegian equivalent of "that's what she said".

"Jøss, den var større enn jeg trodde." "Sa brura!"

"Wow, it's bigger than I thought." "Said the bride!"


Confirmed by 2 people




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ey up

English Lancashire , England

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Commonly used as a greeting.

“Ey up! How’s things?”


Confirmed by 7 people




bünzli

German Switzerland

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(n.) A "bünzli" is a person who follows rules at all times and wants others to follow them, too. It's usually also associated with people of higher socioeconomic status or older people. It has a partial overlap in meaning with the English slang term "Karen" in that a "bünzli" will also talk to a manager (or some kind of higher official) if something isn't done their way.

"Mi nochber isch sone bünzli. Är het gest dr polizei aglüte weil mr am 22:30 ufem balkon musik glost hän."

"My neighbor is such a bünzli. He called the police yesterday because we were listening to music on our balcony at 10:30pm."





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boven water*

* above water

Dutch Netherlands

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Something that was lost or hidden that has now been found again.

"Zijn de belastingpapieren al weer boven water?"

"Are the tax papers above water again?"


Confirmed by 3 people




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tae greet

Scots Scotland

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(v.) Meaning 'to cry'

"Shut yer weesht an stop yer greetin ye eejit!"

"Shut up and stop crying, you idiot"


Confirmed by 4 people




streets ahead

English Greendale, United States

Reference USED On Occasion BY most people

If you have to ask, you're streets behind.

Pierce: "Abed, your social skills aren't exactly streets ahead."


Confirmed by 8 people




pompette

French France

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(adj.) Tipsy.

"Faites pas attention, je suis pompette."

"Don't mind me, I'm a little bit tipsy."


Confirmed by 11 people




brought to you by Project Olas


cacerolazo*

* casserole

Spanish Various countries

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

Comes from the word “cacerola” meaning "pan". It’s a form of peaceful protest in which protestors create noise by banging together pots and pans. The tradition began in medieval times to shame men who’d marry young girls. It was then taken on by French revolutionaries, and now protestors in Latin America.

“El descontento de la gente ha provocado cacerolazos en Argentina.”

“The people’s discontent has led to the banging on pots and pans in Argentina.”

Confirmed by 4 people




to throw someone in at the deep end

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."


Confirmed by 14 people




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baptism of fire

English English speaking countries

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Immediately having to cope with a stressful situation in order to improve.

"How was your first driving lesson?" "It was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed it."


Confirmed by 10 people




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tandsmør*

* tooth butter

Danish Denmark

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Butter spread so thick that you leave teeth marks in it when you take a bite.

"Jeg elsker hjemmelavet brød med tandsmør."

"I love homemade bread with a thick layer of butter."


Confirmed by 5 people