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Portuguese Brazil

coroa

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(crown) • A word generally used by young people to refer to older people, especially the elderly ones. Also used to refer to someone's or their own parents.

"Eu vim sentado ao lado de um coroa no ônibus." "Vi seus coroas ontem numa loja."

"I came sitting next to a crown (old guy) at the bus." "I saw your crowns (parents) yesterday at a store."

Portuguese Mozambique

colocar na garrafa

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(put in a bottle) • The act of witchcraft in which the lover’s name is writen and put in a bottle to make them fall in love like crazy.

"Do jeito que sou louca por ele, esse moço só pode ter me colocado na garrafa."

"The way I am crazy about him this man must have put me in a bottle."

Portuguese Mozambique

marandza

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

A very young women sho dates man old enough to be their fathers or grandfathers for monetary gain. Many times while having a younger boyfriend.

"Essa pita é uma marandza, primeira semana, meu salário bazou, nem dinheiro de pão tenho."

"This girl is a marandza, first week with her and my money is gone, I can’t even buy bread now."

Portuguese Mozambique

danone

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Danone is a yogurt made for small children uded to describe young man dating older women.

"Ih amiga, deixaste teu marido por um danone de verdade?"

"Oh my god, you really left your husband for a danone?"

Portuguese Mozambique

em Nkobe

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

It means somewhere really far away. Middle of nowhere. It’s a rural area said to still be living under colonization from how outdated it is.

"Não posso namorar com ela. Vive em Nkobe."

"I can’t date that girl. She lives in Nkobe."

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Por Brazil, Brazil

lenga-lenga

Expression USED Frequently BY Everybody

Meaningless conversation. Boring and monotonous conversation, narrative or oratory piece.

"Essa tua lenga-lenga está me cansando."

"This lenga-lenga of yours is tiring me."

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Portuguese Brazil

o Papa é argentino, mas Deus é brasileiro

Expression USED On Occasion BY Adults

(the Pope is Argentine, but God is Brazilian) • It is used whenever Brazil faces or is compared to Argentina. You can also just say "God is Brazilian" when something good happens in Brazil.

"Acho que a Argentina ganha a próxima copa" "Não mesmo! O papa é argentino, mas Deus é brasileiro"

"I think Argentina wins the next world cup" "No way! The Pope is Argentine, but God is Brazilian"

Confirmed by 2 people

Portuguese Brazil

tirar o cavalinho da chuva

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

(to take the little horse off the rain) • When someone should not get their hopes up.

"Mãe, posso jogar videogame?" "Pode tirar o cavalinho da chuva porque você precisa estudar pra prova."

"Mom, can I play videogame?" "You can take the little horse off the rain because you need to study for the test."

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Portuguese Brazil

virado no Jiraya

Expression USED On Occasion BY Teens

(to be acting like Jiraya) • When someone's very angry because something upsetting happened, or simply woke up in a bad mood, they are "like Jiraya".

"Elisa ficou virada no Jiraya quando viu que ficou em terceiro lugar no concurso."

"Elisa started acting like Jiraya after she discovered that she got third place in the contest. "

Portuguese Portugal

miúfa

Slang USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

A slang for saying you're really scared.

"Vá, entra! Então, estás com miúfa?"

"Come on, come in! What's going on, are you with miúfa?"

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Portuguese Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

71

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

An abbreviation of "171", the penal code for swindling and fraud. Used to refer to a person that often lies.

"Na minha cidade tem um político muito sete um"

"In my city there is a very seven one politician"

Portuguese Brazil

facada

Slang USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • (stab) • When something is too expensive.

"The video game price is a stab"

"O preço do vídeo game tá uma facada"

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Portuguese Portugal

cu de Judas

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(Juda's ass ) • A remote place, far away, in the end of the world.

“Mas onde fica? Nem imaginas, no cu de Judas.”

“But where is it? You cannot imagine, in Judas’s ass.”

Confirmed by 3 people

Portuguese Brazil

enfiar o pé na jaca

Idiom USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(to stick your foot in the jackfruit) • It's used in moments when someone drinks too much alcohol or eats too much junk food. Generally used when someone goes beyond their limits.

"Depois de uma semana de dieta, ele acabou enfiando o pé na jaca no sábado"

"After a week on a diet, he ended up sticking his foot in the jackfruit on Saturday"

Confirmed by 2 people

Portuguese Minas Gerais, Brazil

trem

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(train) • Literally means "train", but is used as "thing", "stuff"

"Ê trem bom!"

"What a nice train!"

Confirmed by 2 people

Portuguese Portugal

nabo

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(turnip) • Used for someone who's clumsy or can't do anything.

"Ele é um nabo."

"He's a turnip."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Portuguese Brazil

vá plantar batatas

Idiom USED In the past BY Older Generations

(go plant potatoes) • It means “leave me alone!” or “go away!”

“Quer ficar comigo, gata?” “Não quero não! Vá plantar batatas!”

“Wanna hook up with me, sexy?” “No, I don’t want to! Go plant potatoes!”

Confirmed by 2 people

Portuguese Portugal

bom como o milho

Expression USED On Occasion BY Teens

(fine as corn) • Used to describe someone very attractive.

"Viste aquele rapaz a passar na rua? Bom como o milho."

"Did you see that guy crossing the street? Fine as corn."

Confirmed by 2 people

Portuguese Brazil

cada cachorro que lamba sua caceta

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(each dog that licks its own dick) • A way of saying "Everybody has their own problems". When someone is in trouble and you don't care.

"My parents constantly pick on me and punish me. I need help" "Each dog that licks its own dick"

"Meus pais estão constatmente me enchendo o saco e me punindo. Preciso de ajuda. "Cada cachorro que lamba sua caceta"

Portuguese Brazil

do nada

Expression USED Very frequently BY Young People

(from the nothing) • "Do nada", in a free translation is equivalent to "out of the blue", is something very unexpected.

"Ela terminou comigo do nada."

"She broke up with me from the nothing"

Confirmed by 2 people