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French Québec (Canada)

frette

Slang USED Frequently BY Everybody

Used to describe something that is very cold. Mostly used to talk about the weather, but can also be used to talk about anything that is very cold. It is a variation of the word "froid", which means cold. But, since Québec and Canada are very up north, "froid" was not cold enough, hence came another level of cold: "frette". This expression can be transformed in other expressions, like "tite frette", which translates to "a cold one", meaning a beer.

"Wow, il fait tellement froid ici." "Il fait pas froid, il fait frette." "Wow, c'est vraiment de l'eau frette."

"Wow, it is so cold here." "It is not cold, it is frette." "Wow, this is really frette water."

French Québec

beurrer épais

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(to butter thickly) • To exaggerate, like putting a very liberal coat of butter on a piece of toast. Also, in a way, to brag.

"Je crois qu'il en a beurré épais quand il a raconté son aventure." "J'ai l'air d'en beurrer épais, mais c'est vraiment arrivé comme ça !"

"I think he buttered thickly in his retelling of his adventure." "I do not mean to butter thickly, but it really happened that way!"

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French Québec

pantoute

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Not at all, none. Also used to insist on that idea.

"Ça ne me dérange pas pantoute !" "Je ne vois rien pantoute."

"It doesn't bother me at all" "I can't see anything."