syn

dosh

English England

Slang USED On Occasion BY People Under 50

(n.) Means money, mainly used by middle-aged people who like to think they're 'down with the kids'.

"I've got a hell of a lot of dosh in my wallet."

"I've got a large amount of money in my wallet."


Confirmed by 2 people




syn

ey up

English Lancashire , England

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Commonly used as a greeting.

“Ey up! How’s things?”


Confirmed by 6 people




scran

English England

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

Scran is an informal word for food. It doesn’t describe any particular type of food or any specific meal, it can be used at any time of the day.

“Oh I proper fancy some scran.”





syn

noggin

English England

Word USED On Occasion BY Parents

Noggin is an informal word for ‘head’.

“Use your noggin”


Confirmed by 7 people




you make a better door than a window

English England

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

This phrase is used if somebody is blocking your view. It’s a way of asking somebody to move out of the way. Since your body is dense, nobody can see through it - hence it being compared to a door, rather than a window - something you can see through.

“You make a better door than a window” “Oops! Sorry, I’ll move out of the way”


Confirmed by 6 people




alt

Where to?*

* Where?

English Devon, England

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

A phrase in which the ‘to’ refers to a specific place. Asking “where someone is to” is like asking where someone is.

“Where’s he to?”


Confirmed by 8 people




dreckly

English | Devon and Cornwall Devon and Cornwall , England

Word USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(adv.) In the near future.

"I’ll see you dreckly."


Confirmed by 3 people




cakey tea

English Devon and Cornwall, England

Standard Phrase USED In the past BY Older Generations

(n.) Having a cup of tea with baked goods, usually after lunch. Similar to afternoon tea.

"Come around and we’ll have cakey tea."


Confirmed by 3 people




a grand

English England

Slang USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) A generally informal word meaning £1000

"I wouldn't mind a spare couple grand to spend on a holiday."

"I wouldn't mind a spare couple thousand pounds to spend on a holiday."


Confirmed by 7 people