English Australia

chook

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

A short form of the word chicken, especially referring to a cooked chicken.

"The Christmas chook is almost ready!"

alt

English Australia

rellie

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

Short form of the word 'relative'; a family member. Plural form would be "relos".

"I visited the rellos in Hanoi recently."

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English Canada

flow

Word USED On Occasion BY Ice hockey players

Long hair that sticks out of a hockey player's helmet

"Jagr has the best flow in hockey history."

English North America

chirp

Word USED Frequently BY Ice hockey players

Chirping is mocking another player with comedic or insulting remarks. 'Chirp' can also be used as a noun to describe such a remark.

"These are some of the craziest chirps I've ever been called in a hockey game. Someone once told me that I looked like Donkey from Shrek."

English Australia

Maccas

Abbreviation USED Very frequently BY Most People

A short form of McDonald's.

"Do you want to go to Maccas?"

Confirmed by 2 people

English The South, United States

nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

Idiom USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

Used to describe someone who is nervous. The imagery is that a cat with a long tail would be in constant danger of having its tail crushed under the moving chairs in a room full of rocking chairs

“Did you get to see her before she gets on stage?” “Yes, she’s nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs, but I think she’ll be great.”

Confirmed by 2 people

English English speaking countries

to be over the moon

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People, 30+

To be really happy about something.

I got the job I really wanted, and I am over the moon about it!

Confirmed by 4 people

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English United States

talking peanuts

Expression USED In the past BY People from the countryside

Refer to something of cheap or low value. If something is surprisingly inexpensive, you could say "it's peanuts." Or if you're working for a very low wage, you could say "You're working for peanuts." Peanuts are a very cheap item in this context.

"It's going to cost $40 for all 5 of you to go." "That's $8 a person. You're talking peanuts at that point."

English United Kingdom

to go balls to the walls

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

To try your best / give everything to achieve something

Danny is really working hard at the gym. Yeah, he’s going balls to the walls.

Confirmed by 3 people

English Australia

Scarnon?

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A very shortened version of "What's going on?", used in the way of asking someone what they're up to or how they are.

"Hey Gaz, scarnon mate? Been busy?"

"Hello Gary, what's going on? Have you been busy?"

Confirmed by 3 people

syn

English United States

it’s been a minute

Expression USED On Occasion BY Millenials

It’s been a while, it’s been a long time, it has not happened recently

"It’s been a minute since I’ve seen my coworkers in person. The office has been closed for over a year. "

Confirmed by 5 people

ety

English Worldwide

milkshake duck

Expression USED On Occasion BY people on the internet

(n.) • A milkshake duck describes the phenomena on the internet for a viral story to appear wholesome, only to be ruined later by the backstory of the person or thing featured in the story. It is based on a tweet by @pixelatedboat that says "The whole internet loves Milkshake Duck, a lovely duck that drinks milkshakes! *5 seconds later* We regret to inform you the duck is racist".

"Did you see the video of the guy on zoom with the filter saying he was not a cat?" "I did! So funny. Too bad it turned out to be a milkshake duck."

Confirmed by 3 people

English United Kingdom

wicked

Slang USED On Occasion BY People Over 30

(evil) • Another word for cool, awesome, great, amazing or fun

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was wicked!"

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was great!"

Confirmed by 8 people

ety

English English speaking countries

mentrification

Neologism USED On Rare Occasion BY women

When a field of interest of women is taken over by men, subsequently pushing out the women who were previously there.

"Computer science used to be filled with women until men came in and mentrified the field."

Confirmed by 4 people

English | Bristolian Bristol, United Kingdom

cheers drive

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A greeting to express thanks to a bus driver when getting of the bus

"Cheers drive! Have a good day!"

Confirmed by 2 people

ety

English United Kingdom

car crash underwear

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY women

The kind of underwear women are supposed to wear, just in case you end up in a car crash.

"I don't want to show you my underwear, cos obviously I haven't got my car crash underwear on."

English United Kingdom

they couldn't lie straight in bed

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

The person referred to is very dishonest and is unable to tell the truth in any context.

"Boris Johnson couldn't lie straight in bed."

Confirmed by 3 people

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English United States

comb over

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

A bald man combing the rest of his hair over his bald spot.

"Look at that - Max has a serious comb over."

Confirmed by 6 people

ety

English Canada

fits like a gunny sack

Expression USED Frequently BY Some People

Expression used to describe how poorly a garment fits to the body of the person wearing it.

"What do you think of my dress?" "Sorry but it fits like a gunny sack."

English Canada

fits like a glove

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

It is a standard and frequently used way to say that something fits extremely well.

"That's a beautiful jacket and it fits him like a glove."

Confirmed by 7 people