English Australia

Scarnon?

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A very shortened version of "What's going on?", used in the way of asking someone what they're up to or how they are.

"Hey Gaz, scarnon mate? Been busy?"

"Hello Gary, what's going on? Have you been busy?"

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English United States

it’s been a minute

Expression USED On Occasion BY Millenials

It’s been a while, it’s been a long time, it has not happened recently

"It’s been a minute since I’ve seen my coworkers in person. The office has been closed for over a year. "

Confirmed by 3 people

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English Worldwide

milkshake duck

Expression USED On Occasion BY people on the internet

(n.) • A milkshake duck describes the phenomena on the internet for a viral story to appear wholesome, only to be ruined later by the backstory of the person or thing featured in the story. It is based on a tweet by @pixelatedboat that says "The whole internet loves Milkshake Duck, a lovely duck that drinks milkshakes! *5 seconds later* We regret to inform you the duck is racist".

"Did you see the video of the guy on zoom with the filter saying he was not a cat?" "I did! So funny. Too bad it turned out to be a milkshake duck."

English United Kingdom

wicked

Slang USED On Occasion BY People Over 30

(evil) • Another word for cool, awesome, great, amazing or fun

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was wicked!"

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was great!"

Confirmed by 4 people

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English English speaking countries

mentrification

Neologism USED On Rare Occasion BY women

When a field of interest of women is taken over by men, subsequently pushing out the women who were previously there.

"Computer science used to be filled with women until men came in and mentrified the field."

Confirmed by 3 people

English | Bristolian Bristol, United Kingdom

cheers drive

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A greeting to express thanks to a bus driver when getting of the bus

"Cheers drive! Have a good day!"

Confirmed by 2 people

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English United Kingdom

car crash underwear

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY women

The kind of underwear women are supposed to wear, just in case you end up in a car crash.

"I don't want to show you my underwear, cos obviously I haven't got my car crash underwear on."

English United Kingdom

they couldn't lie straight in bed

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

The person referred to is very dishonest and is unable to tell the truth in any context.

"Boris Johnson couldn't lie straight in bed."

Confirmed by 2 people

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English United States

comb over

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

A bald man combing the rest of his hair over his bald spot.

"Look at that - Max has a serious comb over."

Confirmed by 3 people

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English Canada

fits like a gunny sack

Expression USED Frequently BY Some People

Expression used to describe how poorly a garment fits to the body of the person wearing it.

"What do you think of my dress?" "Sorry but it fits like a gunny sack."

English Canada

fits like a glove

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

It is a standard and frequently used way to say that something fits extremely well.

"That's a beautiful jacket and it fits him like a glove."

Confirmed by 6 people

English Trinidad and Tobago

lime

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

To lime means to hang out.

"We were liming at the mall yesterday."

English dialect East Anglia and Essex, England

shanny

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

Shanny means scatter-brained or foolish. It is equivalent to 'duzzy' and 'diddy', other Norfolk dialect words meaning silly or foolish.

"That new friend o' yarn, she be a shanny sort of flart."

"Your new friend is a scatter-brained fool."

English United Kingdom

No shit, Sherlock

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A response to someone who is stating the obvious. It refers to the famous detective Sherlock Holmes.

"The sky is blue" "No shit, Sherlock!"

Confirmed by 11 people

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English United States

reinventing the wheel

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everybody

When someone discovers or creates something that already exists. Most often used when someone is wasting significant time or effort to create the thing in question.

"School committees should seek to improve upon existing methods, not reinvent the wheel every time they develop a new curriculum."

Confirmed by 8 people

English Midwest, United States

bread and butter

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

“Bread and butter” means someone’s livelihood or how they make a living. It’s always used together, in this order, and as a singular noun.

“Tourism is the bread and butter of many island countries.” “Did you grow up on a farm?” “Yeah, it was our bread and butter.”

Confirmed by 3 people

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Trinidadian Creole English Trinidad and Tobago

dis rel lash

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everybody

This expression is used in an exclamatory way, as a form of praise for delicious food.

"Dis food rel lash boy!"

"Man, this food is so, so good!"

Confirmed by 2 people

English United States

Miss. Rona

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

A colloquial and joking way to refer to COVID-19.

“Don’t forget your mask or else Miss. Rona will get you”

English United Kingdom

cinnamon roll

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) • A positive, descriptive term for a person that is wholesome (ie kind, helpful, goes out of their way to support others, honest, perhaps sometimes a little naive or innocent). Rarely said to the person in question’s face but about them to others. Common in manga reader forums.

"I saw Christopher helping an old lady across the road this morning." "Aw Christopher is such a cinnamon roll!"

Confirmed by 5 people

English United States

that's what she said!

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Young People

It's a commonly used phrase that describes innocent statements into an explicit one.

"I want you to think about it long and hard." "That's what she said." - The Office

Confirmed by 2 people