annawarnaby

Hi! I'm a native English speaker from Manchester, UK. I also speak fluent French and a bit of German.

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English English speaking countries

stan

Word USED Frequently BY Gen Z'ers

Can be used as a noun or a verb to describe an obsessive love of a celebrity. Used frequently on Twitter. Originates from Eminem's song 'Stan', which tells the story of one of his obsessive fans.

"She really stans BTS." "She's a big Taylor Swift stan."

Confirmed by 7 people



alt

English North , United Kingdom

on my tod

Slang USED On Occasion BY Northerners

Alone or on your own.

"Did you go into town with your friend." "No I was on my tod."

Confirmed by 2 people



English English speaking countries

keep your chin up

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Used to encourage someone to remain positive.

"Have you heard back from the job yet?" "No." "Well, keep your chin up, you'll hear soon!"

Confirmed by 11 people



English United Kingdom

faff

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

An overcomplicated task, especially one perceived as not worth the time.

"I'd love to redecorate but it's just a bit of a faff."

Confirmed by 8 people



English United Kingdom

chockablock

Word USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(adj.) • Used to describe something that is extremely full or crowded.

"There's so much traffic, the motorways are chockablock."

Confirmed by 9 people



English English speaking countries

fomo

Acronym USED Frequently BY Young People

Stands for Fear of Missing Out.

"I decided to stay in on Friday night but when I saw the pictures the next day I had major fomo."

Confirmed by 11 people



alt

English English speaking countries

byob

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Most People

Stands for Bring Your Own Beer/Booze. Often found on party invitations or restaurants to indicate that you are welcome to bring your own drinks with you.

"Can we stop at the shop on the way to the party? It's a BYOB kind of thing."

Confirmed by 12 people



alt

English United Kingdom

curtain twitcher

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • A nosy person who watches his or her neighbours, typically from a curtained window.

"That old lady is always watching us whenever we leave the house, she's a real curtain twitcher."



English English speaking countries

in a pickle

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

Means that you are in a difficult position with no easy solution.

"I'm in a bit of a pickle - the deadline is tomorrow and my computer just broke."



French France

mater

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(v.) • To check out or look at.

"Je vais mater le film ce weekend."

"I'm going to check out the film this weekend."



French France

il y a du monde

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(there is the world ) • Used to mean that there are a lot of people in a place.

"On est dans un bar." "C'est chargé ou pas?" "Ouais, il y a du monde ici."

"We're in a bar." "Is it busy?" "Yeah, there's loads of people here."



French France

pompette

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(adj.) • Tipsy.

"Faites pas attention, je suis pompette."

"Don't mind me, I'm a little bit tipsy."



French | Verlan France

meuf

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(n.) • Girl or woman. From the verlan 'femme'.

"On a passé une soirée entre meufs."

"We had a girls night."



English English speaking countries

loml

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Gen Z'ers

(n.) • An acronym for 'love of my life'. Often used on Instagram as a caption for a picture of your partner.

"Look at him. #loml"



English English speaking countries

to carry a torch for someone

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

To admire or love somebody in secret. Comes from the metaphor of a burning flame, i.e. to keep a fire burning.

"She's always carried a torch for him, maybe they'll get back together one day."



English English speaking countries

humblebrag

Portmanteau USED On Occasion BY Millenials

(n.) • A modest or self-deprecating statement that has the actual intention of drawing attention to something the speaker is proud of.

"He was complaining about having too many job offers to choose from." "What a humblebrag!"



German Germany

Geborgenheit

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used to describe a deep sense of security and comfort. It is the feeling that everything is exactly how it should be, such as snuggling up with a loved one or eating home-cooked food when returning to your childhood home.

"Meine Kinder genießen die Geborgenheit einer liebevollen Familie."

"My children enjoy the comfort of a loving family."



German Germany

jein

Portmanteau USED Frequently BY Some People

(yesno) • A contraction of the words "ja" (yes) and "nein" (no). It means that you agree to what has being said, but that you disagree about one aspect that has been mentioned or that you restrict your affirmation.

"Kann ich mir dein Auto ausleihen?" "Jein, höchstens für die nächste halbe Stunde. Dann brauche ich es selber."

"Can I borrow your car?" "Yes, but only for the next half hour. Then I need it myself."



English English speaking countries

to throw someone in at the deep end

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) • To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."



syn

English English speaking countries

baptism of fire

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Immediately having to cope with a stressful situation in order to improve.

"How was your first driving lesson?" "It was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed it."



alt

Danish Denmark

tandsmør

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

(tooth butter) • Butter spread so thick that you leave teeth marks in it when you take a bite.

"Jeg elsker hjemmelavet brød med tandsmør."

"I love homemade bread with a thick layer of butter."



English English speaking countries

hangry

Portmanteau USED On Occasion BY Most People

(adj.) • To be angry or irritated because of hunger.

"Can you hurry up? I'm starting to get hangry."



French France

avoir la dalle

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To be very hungry.

"Je commence à avoir la dalle."

"I'm starting to get hungry."



English United Kingdom

to have your head screwed on

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

To think or act in a smart and sensible way.

"What do you think of the new girl?" "She's good, she's got her head screwed on."



English English speaking countries

ok, boomer

Expression USED On Occasion BY Millenials

(interj.) • Used in a humorous or ironic manner to dismiss closed-minded opinions from the baby boomer generation (people born between 1946 and 1965) and older people more generally. Often used when someone's opinion is so out-of-touch that it would take too long to explain something to them.

"If you just stopped eating avocado toast, you'd be able to afford a house in no time." "Ok, boomer."



alt

English United Kingdom

#ClapForCarers

Hashtag USED In the past BY Most People

Hashtag used to express gratitude for NHS workers during the coronavirus pandemic. Refers to the act of clapping outside your house at 8pm on a Thursday night.

"A special #ClapForCarers will take place at 5pm today as we say happy birthday to our precious NHS."



English Essex, United Kingdom

mugged off

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

To be played for a fool or rejected (romantically).

"Are you still dating that girl?" "Nah, I've been mugged off."



English Southern England, United Kingdom

bun

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

(v.) • Used when displaying a displeasure to a certain idea or thought.

"Do you want to go to the gym later?" "Nah, bun that!"



English United Kingdom

spend a penny

Expression USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

Euphemism meaning "to go to the bathroom", originating from a time when public toilets charged one penny. It is used mostly by women, as men's urinals were free to use.

"I'll be back in a minute, just going to spend a penny."



English United Kingdom

skive

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To play truant, meaning to not go in to work or school when you are supposed to.

"Let's skive maths this afternoon, I haven't done the homework."



English United Kingdom

quid

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(n.) • The British pound.

"Can you lend me two quid for some chewing gum?"



English United Kingdom

leg it

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(v.) • To run very fast.

"I forgot my keys so I legged it back to my house."



English Northern England, United Kingdom

baccy

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Shortened word for 'tobacco'.

"I'm rolling a cigarette, can I use your baccy?"



syn

English Northern England, United Kingdom

How do?

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

Greeting often used between walkers as they pass each other on a hike. It doesn't really mean anything but it an expression of friendliness that does not require an actual answer.

"How do?" "How do?"



syn

English United Kingdom

bagsy

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To claim something for yourself, reserving it so someone else can't take it.

"Bagsy front seat!" "Don't take the last slice of cake, I've bagsy'd it."



English United Kingdom

the Mrs

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used by men to refer to their partner. Does not necessarily mean they are married.

"Want to go for a beer tonight?" "I can't, I'm staying in with the Mrs."



French France

mytho

Slang USED Very frequently BY Most People

(adj.) • Used to describe someone who lies, often to make themselves sounds better. Abbreviation of 'mythomane'.

"Ne l’écoute pas, il est gros mytho."

"Don't listen to him, he's a complete liar."



French France

bouffer

Slang USED Very frequently BY Most People

(v.) • To eat.

"Viens, on va chercher à bouffer."

"Come on, let's find something to eat."



English United Kingdom

punching

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(v.) • Used to indicate that someone's partner is more attractive than them, and they have done well to get them. Often used by men in a positive way to praise their friend's girlfriend.

"You're punching with her, mate, she's gorgeous!"



English United Kingdom

buzzin'

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

(adj.) • Being extremely happy or excited. Short for 'buzzing'.

"She just asked me out, I'm absolutely buzzin'."



French France

défoncé

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) • Used to mean wasted or out of it, after having consumed alcohol or drugs.

"Tu te souviens de la soirée?" "Pas du tout, j'étais complètement défoncé."

"Do you remember the party?" "Not at all, I was completely wasted."



French France

une taffe

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • A drag of a cigarette.

"Je peux te prendre une taffe?"

"Can I have a drag?"



English United Kingdom

to have a knack for

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

An ability or special method for doing something easily and well.

"The door's a bit stiff, there's a knack to opening it." "She's got a knack for baking, she should open a shop."



English Northern England & Scotland, United Kingdom

lass

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • A girl or young woman.

"Check out that lass over there."



English United Kingdom

innit

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

(interj.) • Contraction of the phrase "isn't it?". Used to express agreement and confirm something someone else has said.

"It's so cold today." "Innit."



English Sunderland, United Kingdom

canny

Word USED Very frequently BY Most People

(adj.) • Used to express positive feelings towards something.

"Yeah I like him, he's a canny lad."



English Northern England, United Kingdom

cuppa

Word USED Very frequently BY Some People

(n.) • A cup of tea. Contraction of the phrase "cup of".

"Want a cuppa?" "Ok, go on then."



English United Kingdom

famous last words

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

An ironic comment on an overconfident assertion that may later be proved wrong.

"I'll be perfectly fine going on my own!" "Famous last words!"



French France

#BalanceTonPorc

Hashtag USED Frequently BY Some People

(Denounce your pig ) • The French version of the #MeToo movement. Used on Twitter to condemn sexual harassment and assault.

"Le mouvement #BalanceTonPorc a commencé en 2017 avec les allégations d'abus sexuels contre Harvey Weinstein."

"The #BalanceTonPorc movement began in 2017 with the sexual abuse allegations against Harvey Weinstein."



French France

La vache!

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) • (The cow!) • An expression of surprise, admiration, or disappointment.

"Ah la vache! On s’est fait écraser par le PSG à nouveau."

"Oh damn, we got crushed by PSG (Paris Saint-Germain) again."



syn

French France

poser un lapin

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(to put down a rabbit) • To stand someone up.

"Pourquoi tu pleures?" "Il m'a posé un lapin."

"Why are you crying?" "He put me down a rabbit."



French France

un troquet

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

A local cafe or bar. Often a relaxed and informal place.

"Je pris un café au troquet."

"I had a coffee at the local cafe."



French France

le lendemain de cuite

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

The day after a night of drinking.

"Un burger bien fat en lendemain de cuite n'est en fait pas une très bonne idée."

"Eating a big fatty burger the night after drinking isn't a very good idea."



French France

avoir un coeur d'artichaut

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to have an artichoke's heart) • To fall in love easily and often.

"Il nous a raconté les peines de son coeur d'artichaut."

"He told us about his many failed romances."



French Paris, France

bobo

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • A shortened version of the word 'bourgeois-bohème', meaning a middle-class person with money and liberal, left-wing political views. They are often seen as trendy and intellectual, but in a way that is performative. It is often said in a derogatory way.

"Le nouveau restaurant végan va attirer les bobos."

"The new vegan restaurant will attract the bobos."



English United States

86

Slang USED On Occasion BY Bartenders

(v.) • Used in the service industry, particularly in bars, to describe an item that has run out, a person to be kicked out or to be refused service, or to lose your job. It can be used more loosely to refer to removing something.

“We just sold our last oyster dish, so 86 oysters for the rest of the night.” "The new guy's been 86'd. He wasn't right for the job."



syn

English Yorkshire, United Kingdom

mardy

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(adj.) • Used to describe someone who is sulking or in a bad mood.

"I'd leave her alone, she's being mardy today."



English Manchester, United Kingdom

ginnel

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used to describe an alley or passageway between houses.

"I walked my dog through the ginnel to get to the park."



English Manchester , United Kingdom

chuffed

Word USED Frequently BY Some People

(adj.) • Used to express satisfaction and happiness.

"I'm chuffed with my new trainers".