English Midwest, United States

bread and butter

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

“Bread and butter” means someone’s livelihood or how they make a living. It’s always used together, in this order, and as a singular noun.

“Tourism is the bread and butter of many island countries.” “Did you grow up on a farm?” “Yeah, it was our bread and butter.”

Confirmed by 4 people

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Trinidadian Creole English Trinidad and Tobago

dis rel lash

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everybody

This expression is used in an exclamatory way, as a form of praise for delicious food.

"Dis food rel lash boy!"

"Man, this food is so, so good!"

Confirmed by 2 people

English United States

Miss. Rona

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

A colloquial and joking way to refer to COVID-19.

“Don’t forget your mask or else Miss. Rona will get you”

Confirmed by 3 people

English United Kingdom

cinnamon roll

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) • A positive, descriptive term for a person that is wholesome (ie kind, helpful, goes out of their way to support others, honest, perhaps sometimes a little naive or innocent). Rarely said to the person in question’s face but about them to others. Common in manga reader forums.

"I saw Christopher helping an old lady across the road this morning." "Aw Christopher is such a cinnamon roll!"

Confirmed by 7 people

English United States

that's what she said!

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Young People

It's a commonly used phrase that describes innocent statements into an explicit one.

"I want you to think about it long and hard." "That's what she said." - The Office

Confirmed by 4 people

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English United Kingdom

not a foggy one

Expression USED On Occasion BY Adults

It’s an abbreviation of the phrase “I haven’t (got) a clue in the foggiest”. When you really have no idea why something has happened or the answer to a question. Saying “not a foggy one” can be used depending on the individuals choice of changing the original phrase, but it is always understood by other Brits when used.

“Do you remember which bus stop we’re supposed to get off at?” “Not a foggy one, mate. I’m just following everyone else!”

Confirmed by 3 people

English South East, United States

Bless your heart

Expression USED Frequently BY Mostly women in the Southern USA

To someone from outside it sounds like a compliment but it is really a polite way to say “you’re an idiot”. Can also be used at the end of a rude sentence to try to end the sentence on a “positive” note.

“Someone called saying I won a cruise and all I have to do is give them my bank information! Time for a trip!” “Oh honey, bless your heart”.

Confirmed by 3 people

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English Canada, United States

thanks, Captain Obvious

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

Used sarcastically when someone points out the obvious. Can be used in jest between friends or scathingly sarcastic as an insult.

“The sign says “pull” the door open.” “Thanks, Captain Obvious!”

Confirmed by 4 people

English Various countries

idgaf

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Young People

Short for "I don't give a fuck"

"idgaf what anyone thinks"

Confirmed by 6 people

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æ

English Midwest, United States

ope

Interjection USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(interj.) • Interjection used to indicate surprise and/or mild disappointment. Frequently followed by the word “well.”

“Ope, well, guess we can’t see the movie anymore” *gets bumped into by someone* “ope, watch yourself!“ “Ope, well, then I guess I don’t know, then”

Confirmed by 3 people

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English England, United Kingdom

the pot calling the kettle black

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

Criticizing something that you yourself are guilty of.

"He said my dog was ugly but his own is so inbred it can hardly breathe!" "Talk about the pot calling the kettle black!"

Confirmed by 5 people

English Australia

munted

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(adj.) • severely damaged or very drunk

"After that wreck, his car was completely munted." "He's too munted to speak!"

Confirmed by 3 people

English | Australian English Australia

Nigel

Slang USED In the past BY Teens

Used to describe the state of being by yourself, not knowing anyone.

"Chemistry would be so much better if I weren't Nigel."

English United Kingdom

on my Larry

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

Refers to someone who is a loner. Someone who has no friends.

"Please hurry up! I'm all on my Larry"

Confirmed by 2 people

English English speaking countries

stan

Word USED Frequently BY Gen Z'ers

Can be used as a noun or a verb to describe an obsessive love of a celebrity. Used frequently on Twitter. Originates from Eminem's song 'Stan', which tells the story of one of his obsessive fans.

"She really stans BTS." "She's a big Taylor Swift stan."

Confirmed by 7 people

English United Kingdom

hatchings, matchings and despatchings

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

Births, weddings, and deaths.

"I only go to church for hatchings, matchings, and despatchings."

Confirmed by 2 people

English Canada

double-double

Slang USED Frequently BY Canadians

(n.) • Common way to drink coffee in Canada. 2 milk and 2 sugar.

“Hi, can I order a double-double please?”

Confirmed by 2 people

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English Australia

the Rona

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • Aussies often refer to coronavirus as the Rona, or just Rona. We abbreviate/shorten so many words, guess it's not a surprise we've shortened this too.

"Steve caught The Rona when he went overseas so now he's in isolation for two weeks".

Confirmed by 7 people

English United States

the Rona

Reference USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) • A female name used to refer to the corona virus.

“Did you hear they canceled classes cause of the Rona?”

Confirmed by 4 people

English United States

pop

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • A sparkling drink.

"What pop would you like, ma'am?" "A root beer, please."

Confirmed by 5 people