French French speaking countries

se prendre un râteau

Expression USED Frequently BY People Under 30

(to take oneself a rake) • Used when you tell someone that you like him/her and (s)he doesn't like you back. When you are the one whose feelings are hurt, you "take yourself a rake". When you are the one who hurts the other person's feelings, you "give a rake" (mettre un râteau).

"Je me suis pris un râteau hier... Je lui ai dit que je l'aimais bien et il m'a répondu : "Désolé, t'es pas mon type"."

"I took myself a rake yesterday... I told him that I liked him and he replied: "Sorry, you're not my type"."

Confirmed by 8 people

French French speaking countries

voilà voilà

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Most People

When you finish telling something that might be awkward, sad or another quite negative feeling, you often end the story with "voilà voilà". The use and tone is different from the enthusiastic "voilà!".

"Hier, je marchais dans la rue tout en buvant mon café, et j'ai glissé sur une peau de banane. Je suis tombé et j'ai renversé mon café très chaud sur moi. Malheureusement, la rue était bondée, donc tout le monde m'a vu tomber. Voilà voilà..."

"Yesterday, I was walking down the street while drinking my coffee, and I slipped on a banana peel. I fell and spilled my very hot coffee on myself. Unfortunately, the street was crowded, so everyone saw me falling. So there you go..."

Confirmed by 10 people

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French French speaking countries

prendre ses jambes à son cou

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Adults

(to take you legs to your neck) • To run away as fast as possible.

"A chaque fois que Bip Bip voit Coyote, il prend ses jambes à con cou."

"Whenever the Road Runner sees Wile E. Coyote, he takes his legs to his neck."

Confirmed by 7 people

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French French speaking countries

prendre la poudre d'escampette

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Adults

To run away, to flee.

"Hier, ma maison a été cambriolée, et au moment où je cherchais les voleurs, ils avaient déjà pris la poudre d'escampette."

"Yesterday, my house was robbed, and when I looked for the thieves, they had already fled."

Confirmed by 7 people

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French French speaking countries

avoir été bercé trop près du mur

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Adults

(to have been rocked too close to the wall) • It's a way to say that a person is stupid. By being rocked near a wall, a baby's head could be bumped and cause damage to the brain.

"Jenny, un des personages de la BD "Les Nombrils", a été bercé trop très du mur. Je n'ai jamais vu quelqu'un d'aussi débile mais tellement drôle!"

"Jenny, one of the "The Bellybuttons" comic characters, was rocked too close to the wall. I've never seen a person that stupid but so funny!"

Confirmed by 7 people

French French speaking countries

ne pas être fût-fût

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(not to be clever-clever) • Used to refer to a dumb person or a person doing stupid things, but it's lighter than saying that a person is stupid. It comes from "fûté", that means "clever".

"Cette fille n'est vraiment pas fût-fût; elle pense que les lions sont des animaux marins!"

"That girl really isn't clever-clever; she thinks that lions are marine animals!"

Confirmed by 6 people

French French speaking countries

avoir la tête dans le cul

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to have the head in the butt) • It means to be feeling hazy, tired or not feeling that well.

"J'ai la tête dans le cul ce matin: j'ai à peine dormi de la nuit."

"I have the head in the butt this morning: I've barely slept this night."

Confirmed by 6 people

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French French speaking countries

pognon

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • Money.

"Tu peux me prêter un peu de pognon stp?"

"Can you lend me some money please?"

Confirmed by 6 people

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French French speaking countries

oseille

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(n.) • (sorrel) • Money.

"J'ai grave besoin d'oseille!"

"I really need sorrel!"

Confirmed by 6 people

French French speaking countries

être le vilain petit canard

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

(to be the bad little duckling) • Refers to a person who is disliked by other people and left aside because (s)he is (physically, morally, etc) different from the others.

"Cet enfant est le vilain petit canard de sa classe ; tout le monde se moque de lui parce qu'il boite."

"This child is the bad little duckling of his class; everyone laughs at him because he has a limp."

Confirmed by 6 people

French French speaking countries

être comme chien et chat

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(to be like dog and cat) • Used to describe people who are constantly in conflict, like cats and dogs, that are believed to dislike each other.

"Ma soeur en moi sommes comme chien et chat : il est impossible pour nous de s'entendre plus de quelques minutes. Nous nous disputons tout le temps."

"My sister and I are like dog and cat: it's impossible for us to get along more than a few minutes. We are always arguing."

Confirmed by 8 people

French France

balles

Name USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • Slang term for euros. Very old slang word (19th) that used to designate a Franc. The term suffered a decline in use after the changeover to the euro before being used frequently again.

"T’as pas dix balles ?"

"Do you have ten euros ?"

Confirmed by 9 people

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French Québec, Canada

piastre

Word USED Frequently BY everyone

(n.) • In Québec French, "piastre" means dollar. Pronounced as "piasse", and often missheard as "pièce" by European French speakers.

"Combien t'a coûté ta nouvelle chemise ?" "20 piastres!"

"How much did you pay for your shirt?" "20 bucks!"

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French | Canadian French Quebec, Canada

être habillé comme la chienne à Jacques

Expression USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(to be dressed like Jacques' female dog. ) • Used to describe a person dressed poorly. Apparently, a man named Jacques Aubert, who lived during the 19th century, was known as single all his life and only had one companion: a female dog that lost all of its fur because of some disease. During cold winter times, he would dress up his dog with old clothes and rags.

"On a beau être en vacances, ce n'est pas une raison pour s'habiller comme la chienne à Jacques."

"Even if we're on a vacation, it's not a reason to be dressed like Jacques' female dog."

Confirmed by 2 people

French French speaking countries

On ne trouve pas l'argent sous les sabots d'un cheval

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(Money can't be found under a horse's hoof) • Money doesn't grow on trees.

"Je ne peux pas t'acheter ce sac, il est beaucoup trop cher ! Tu penses qu'on trouve l'argent sous les sabots d'un cheval?"

"I can't buy you this bag, it's way too expensive! Do you think money can be found under a horse's hoof?"

Confirmed by 5 people

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French French speaking countries

la semaine des quatre jeudis

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(the week of the four Thursdays) • Used to express that something will never happen. In the past, Thursday was a break day for pupils and teachers. So, having a week with four Thursdays would have been a wonderful dream, but it will never happen.

" - Quand vas-tu me présenter à tes parents? - La semaine des quatre jeudis."

" - When will you introduce me to your parents? - On the week of the four Thursdays."

Confirmed by 5 people

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French French speaking countries

vieux jeu

Word USED On Rare Occasion BY Adults

(adj.) • (old game) • Describes a person with old-fashioned manners or way of thinking.

"Elle est un peu vieux jeu ; selon elle, ce sont les garçons qui doivent faire le premier pas."

"She is a bit old game; in her view, boys should make the first move."

Confirmed by 6 people

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French Belgium

baptême

Word USED On Occasion BY Students

(n.) • (baptism) • An initiation ritual in Belgian universities in order to join one of the university groups. The students who succeed in the initiation are called "baptisés" (= baptised). The "bleus" (= "blues"; the students doing the initiation) have to take part in various activities for a few weeks. A "baptême" is a bit like fraternities and sororities in the US, but there's no attention payed to gender, no restricted number of members, and the baptised don't live together.

"J'ai l'intention de faire mon baptême quand j'irai à l'université, comme ça je pourrai rencontrer des gens plus facilement."

"I intend to do my baptism when I go to university so that I can meet people more easily."

Confirmed by 5 people

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French Belgium

guindaille

Word USED Very frequently BY Students

(n.) • This word refers to student parties, often in university towns, where beer is highly consumed. There is also music, often old French songs, and student songs. You can also use the verb "guindailler".

"A chaque fois que je vais en guindaille, je deviens mort bourré."

"Whenever I go to guindaille, I get very drunk."

Confirmed by 4 people

French French speaking countries

en mettre sa main à couper

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(to put one's hand out to be cut) • Te be extremely sure of something. So sure that you would let your hand to be cut if you're wrong.

"Mon rouge à lèvre a encore disparu! J'en mets ma main à couper que c'est ma soeur qui l'a pris!'

"My lipstick disappeared again! I put my hand out to cut that my sister took it!"

Confirmed by 6 people