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Arabic Palestine

شهيد

Word USED On Occasion BY Everybody

(a witness) • A martyr or someone who was killed for a certain valuable cause. They are witnesses in the since that they are witnesses of injustice in the eyes of god.

"أخويا شهيد، استشهد بغزة وهو بحاول يهرب من القصف."

"My brother is a witness, he was made a witness while trying to escape the shelling."

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Tagalog Philippines

po

Word USED On Occasion BY Everybody

A word of respect to the person talking to. A way to acknowledge seniority or hierarchical level to someone. Widely used before to pay respect to elders.

"Maraming salamat Po"

"Thank you, Sir/Ma'am."

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Arabic Worldwide

صدقة

Word USED Very frequently BY Muslims

As opposed to "zakat", "sadaqah" is voluntary act of charity that Muslims would do to purify themselves, purify their income, or to get closer to Allah (god in Arabic). It includes giving away money, knowledge, prayers, and even smiling.

"يستحب الإكثار من الصدقة في شهر رمضان."

"It's good to give away more Sadaqah in the month of Ramadan."

Serbian Serbia

inat

Word USED Frequently BY Everybody

It can be translated as spite, but the meaning is not quite the same. It's used when you want to say you're doing something (or not) deliberately that someone told you to do.

"Ovo dete mi tera inat svaki dan! Kažem mu da ne dira šporet, a onda on namerno suprotno radi i smeje mi se u facu!"

"This kid spites me every day! I tell him not to touch the stove, and then he deliberately does the opposite and laughs in my face!"

Dutch Dutch Speaking Countries

BOB

Word USED On Occasion BY Everybody

A way to signal you won't be drinking because you are the designated driver for the party.

"Neen dank U ik drink niets. Ik ben BOB."

"No thanks, I don't drink. I'm Bob."

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Arabic Palestine

واوا

Word USED On Occasion BY Kids and Parents

It's a baby/toddler word, usually used by babies or parents talking to their babies to indicate an injury or pain.

"ماما اجري واوا."

"Mama my leg wawa."

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Arabic Palestine

ترَلَلِّي

Word USED On Occasion BY Elders

It's a sound or a song melody that does not have a specific meaning, but is used to mean crazy or foolish.

"هاض زلمة ترللي."

"That man is taralali."

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Italian | Romagnolo Emilia-Romagna, Italy

Amarcord

Word USED On Rare Occasion BY Everybody, especially cinema enthusiasts

(I remember) • Profound memory, nostalgic reenactment or remembrance of the past. Originally a dialectal expression (“a m'arcord”), entered in the common Italian language thanks to the film “Amarcord” by Federico Fellini.

"Ritrovare la bambola della mia infanzia mi ha fatta rivivere un lungo Amarcord."

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German German speaking countries

selbstverständlich

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(adj.) • (selfunderstandable) • This adjective refers to something so obvious that anybody can understand or accept it; you don't need to ask. The noun is Selbstverständlichkeit.

"Kannst du mir helfen?" "Ja, selbstverständlich!" "Ein Baby kann man nicht allein zu Hause lassen. Das ist doch selbstverständlich."

"Can you help me?" "Yes, selfunderstandable" "You can't leave a baby alone at home. That's just selfunderstandable."

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Dutch Netherlands

peperduur

Word USED On Occasion BY some people

(pepper expensive) • Very expensive.

"Die jas is echt peperduur!"

"That jacket is really pepper expensive!"

Dutch Netherlands

grensoverschrijdend

Word USED Very frequently BY everyone

(boundary surpassing) • Used to describe things that are unacceptable. Can often used in combination with "gedrag" (behaviour) to describe someone who displays violent or otherwise unacceptable behaviour.

"Grensoverschrijdend gedrag komt nog steeds vaak voor op de werkvloer."

"Boundary surprassing behavior still often occurs in the workplace."

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Dutch Netherlands

niet de bedoeling

Word USED On Occasion BY some people

(not the intention) • A way to say you disapprove of what is happening, or think that what is happening is ludicrous.

"Ik heb het geld voor eten gebruikt om sigaretten te kopen." "Ja maar dat is niet de bedoeling!"

“I used the food money to buy cigarettes.” "Yes, but that's not the intention!"

Turkish Turkey

yarrak

Word USED Very frequently BY young people

Slang for "penis", sometimes used to refer to an item of bad quality or a surprising find.

"Tavsiye ettiğin yemek yarrak gibiymiş."

"The food you've recommended turned out to be like a dick."

English Edinburgh, Scotland

shan

Word USED On Occasion BY People from Edinburgh

1. Low quality, of poor standard. 2. Unfair, harsh.

"Your ma makes a shan breakfast." "The driver wouldn’t let me on the bus with my chips, how shan is that?"

Serbian Serbia

inat

Word USED Frequently BY Everybody

(in spite) • Usually translated as "in spite", however, it has a positive meaning. It means persisting and succeeding in something against all odds. Like a mother shouting at their child for bad behavior, but secretly being proud of the kid for whatever it is he or she did. It is taking the wrong road, but ploughing forward regardless. It's the ultimate middle finger to seemingly insurmountable odds.

"Inat!"

"In spite!"

German Germany, Switzerland, Austria

doch

Word USED Very frequently BY everybody

It means "No, you are wrong and I am right" in one word.

"Hier darf man nicht schneller als 50 Meilen fahren!“ "Doch!"

"You cannot drive faster than 50 miles here!" "Yes, you can!"

Russian/Ukrainian Russia

зря

Word USED Frequently BY everybody

(in vain) • Standalone, it indicates disapproval of an action someone says to have done, about it being pointless

"Я рассказал ему все" "зря"

"I told him everything" "In vain"

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German Germany

Alter

Word USED On Occasion BY Teens, young people

(old one) • Used to address a (usually familiar or close) person as you would call someone "dude" or "bro" in English, regardless of their actual age.

"Alles klar, Alter?" "Alter, was laberst du?" "Was geht, Alter?"

Swedish | Norrländska Norrland, Sweden

idas

Word USED Frequently BY Everybody

To not have the energy or will to do something.

"Ja ids int me nå längre"

"I don't have the energy, want to anymore"

Hindi, Sanskrit, Indian Languages India

dharma

Word USED Frequently BY Everybody

Dharma is translated into English sometimes as religion. But it is no where near close. In that regard its an actual untranslateable. It comes from the root called "Dhr" - "to bear / carry". Some close translations include righteousness, duty etc.

"Helping a sick person is my Dharma. Taking care of my elderly parents is my Dharma. "