wicked*

* evil

English United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY People Over 30

Another word for cool, awesome, great, amazing or fun

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was wicked!"

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was great!"





cheers drive

English | Bristolian Bristol, United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A greeting to express thanks to a bus driver when getting of the bus

"Cheers drive! Have a good day!"


Confirmed by 2 people




ety

car crash underwear

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY women

The kind of underwear women are supposed to wear, just in case you end up in a car crash.

"I don't want to show you my underwear, cos obviously I haven't got my car crash underwear on."





they couldn't lie straight in bed

En United Kingdom

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

The person referred to is very dishonest and is unable to tell the truth in any context.

"Boris Johnson couldn't lie straight in bed."





No shit, Sherlock

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A response to someone who is stating the obvious. It refers to the famous detective Sherlock Holmes.

"The sky is blue" "No shit, Sherlock!"


Confirmed by 9 people




cinnamon roll

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) A positive, descriptive term for a person that is wholesome (ie kind, helpful, goes out of their way to support others, honest, perhaps sometimes a little naive or innocent). Rarely said to the person in question’s face but about them to others. Common in manga reader forums.

"I saw Christopher helping an old lady across the road this morning." "Aw Christopher is such a cinnamon roll!"


Confirmed by 4 people




syn

alt

not a foggy one

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Occasion BY Adults

It’s an abbreviation of the phrase “I haven’t (got) a clue in the foggiest”. When you really have no idea why something has happened or the answer to a question. Saying “not a foggy one” can be used depending on the individuals choice of changing the original phrase, but it is always understood by other Brits when used.

“Do you remember which bus stop we’re supposed to get off at?” “Not a foggy one, mate. I’m just following everyone else!”


Confirmed by 2 people




ety

syn

the pot calling the kettle black

English England, United Kingdom

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

Criticizing something that you yourself are guilty of.

"He said my dog was ugly but his own is so inbred it can hardly breathe!" "Talk about the pot calling the kettle black!"


Confirmed by 3 people




on my Larry

English United Kingdom

Slang USED On Occasion BY Young People

Refers to someone who is a loner. Someone who has no friends.

"Please hurry up! I'm all on my Larry"


Confirmed by 2 people




hatchings, matchings and despatchings

English United Kingdom

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

Births, weddings, and deaths.

"I only go to church for hatchings, matchings, and despatchings."





ety

syn

a cock and bull story

English London, United Kingdom

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Londoners

It means a long-winded story that is nonsense. The literal translation of the expression is from cock or rooster to donkey/ass.

"Some men’s whole delight is to talk of a Cock and Bull over a pot." (the earliest example in print: The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton,1621)





alt

It’s chucking it down

English United Kingdom

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used for very heavy rain, or rain that has come on very suddenly.

“Would you look at the rain? It’s chucking it down now!”


Confirmed by 3 people




siling it down

English | Yorkshire Yorkshire, United Kingdom

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Just a local way in Yorkshire and the North East of England to talk about heavy rainfall.

"It's siling it down out there."





sound

English North West England, United Kingdom

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) The word 'sound' has two uses and meanings in English slang. The first is as an adjective, to describe a person as cool and/or easy to get on with. The second is as an affirmation, like 'alright' or 'yes, of course'.

"Have you met Josh?" "Yeah, he's well sound." "Is it okay if we get there at about 8pm?" "Yeah, sound, no worries."


Confirmed by 8 people




alt

It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's

English United Kingdom

Idiom USED Frequently BY Older Generations

When dark clouds appear on the horizon, signalling that it's about to rain. The "Bill" in question is usually said to be William Shakespeare, but sometimes Kaiser Wilhelm.

"It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's... I bet it'll rain."