English | Yorkshire Yorkshire, United Kingdom

siling it down

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Just a local way in Yorkshire and the North East of England to talk about heavy rainfall.

"It's siling it down out there."

English North West England, United Kingdom

sound

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) • The word 'sound' has two uses and meanings in English slang. The first is as an adjective, to describe a person as cool and/or easy to get on with. The second is as an affirmation, like 'alright' or 'yes, of course'.

"Have you met Josh?" "Yeah, he's well sound." "Is it okay if we get there at about 8pm?" "Yeah, sound, no worries."

Confirmed by 9 people

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English United Kingdom

It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's

Idiom USED Frequently BY Older Generations

When dark clouds appear on the horizon, signalling that it's about to rain. The "Bill" in question is usually said to be William Shakespeare, but sometimes Kaiser Wilhelm.

"It's looking a bit black over Bill's mother's... I bet it'll rain."

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English Midlands, United Kingdom

round the Wrekin

Expression USED Frequently BY older Midlanders

Slang for going the long way around, based on "the Wrekin", a large hill in east Shropshire, England.

"Sorry I'm late. I got on the wrong bus and it took me round the Wrekin!"

Cornish United Kingdom

divedhow

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(un-drunk) • Sober. Composed of medhow (drunk) and di (un) meaning that Cornish people are either drunk or un-drunk.

“Res yw dhym eva Korev, re dhivedhow esov!”

“I gotta drink a beer, I'm too un-drunk!”

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English United Kingdom

#ClapForCarers

Hashtag USED In the past BY Most People

Hashtag used to express gratitude for NHS workers during the coronavirus pandemic. Refers to the act of clapping outside your house at 8pm on a Thursday night.

"A special #ClapForCarers will take place at 5pm today as we say happy birthday to our precious NHS."

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English United Kingdom

Oright?

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(Are you alright?) • A common and informal way to greet someone.

"Oright mate, how's it going?" "Yeah, not too bad, thanks."

Confirmed by 11 people

English United Kingdom

the Mrs

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used by men to refer to their partner. Does not necessarily mean they are married.

"Want to go for a beer tonight?" "I can't, I'm staying in with the Mrs."

English United Kingdom

got the morbs

Expression USED In the past BY Victorians in the 1880's

Used to describe temporary melancholia, coined from the word "morbid".

"I've got the morbs walking around this cemetery."

Confirmed by 2 people

English United Kingdom

innit

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

(interj.) • Contraction of the phrase "isn't it?". Used to express agreement and confirm something someone else has said.

"It's so cold today." "Innit."

English United Kingdom

famous last words

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

An ironic comment on an overconfident assertion that may later be proved wrong.

"I'll be perfectly fine going on my own!" "Famous last words!"

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English Yorkshire, United Kingdom

mardy

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(adj.) • Used to describe someone who is sulking or in a bad mood.

"I'd leave her alone, she's being mardy today."

English Manchester, United Kingdom

ginnel

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used to describe an alley or passageway between houses.

"I walked my dog through the ginnel to get to the park."

English Manchester , United Kingdom

chuffed

Word USED Frequently BY Some People

(adj.) • Used to express satisfaction and happiness.

"I'm chuffed with my new trainers".

English United Kingdom

to go balls to the walls

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

To try your best / give everything to achieve something

Danny is really working hard at the gym. Yeah, he’s going balls to the walls.

Confirmed by 2 people

English United Kingdom

wicked

Slang USED On Occasion BY People Over 30

(evil) • Another word for cool, awesome, great, amazing or fun

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was wicked!"

"What did you think of the rollercoaster?" "It was great!"

Confirmed by 6 people

English | Bristolian Bristol, United Kingdom

cheers drive

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A greeting to express thanks to a bus driver when getting of the bus

"Cheers drive! Have a good day!"

Confirmed by 2 people

ety

English United Kingdom

car crash underwear

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY women

The kind of underwear women are supposed to wear, just in case you end up in a car crash.

"I don't want to show you my underwear, cos obviously I haven't got my car crash underwear on."

English United Kingdom

they couldn't lie straight in bed

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

The person referred to is very dishonest and is unable to tell the truth in any context.

"Boris Johnson couldn't lie straight in bed."

Confirmed by 3 people

English United Kingdom

No shit, Sherlock

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A response to someone who is stating the obvious. It refers to the famous detective Sherlock Holmes.

"The sky is blue" "No shit, Sherlock!"

Confirmed by 12 people