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English United States

comb over

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

A bald man combing the rest of his hair over his bald spot.

"Look at that - Max has a serious comb over."

Confirmed by 3 people

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English United States

reinventing the wheel

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everybody

When someone discovers or creates something that already exists. Most often used when someone is wasting significant time or effort to create the thing in question.

"School committees should seek to improve upon existing methods, not reinvent the wheel every time they develop a new curriculum."

Confirmed by 8 people

English Midwest, United States

bread and butter

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

“Bread and butter” means someone’s livelihood or how they make a living. It’s always used together, in this order, and as a singular noun.

“Tourism is the bread and butter of many island countries.” “Did you grow up on a farm?” “Yeah, it was our bread and butter.”

Confirmed by 3 people

English United States

Miss. Rona

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

A colloquial and joking way to refer to COVID-19.

“Don’t forget your mask or else Miss. Rona will get you”

English United States

that's what she said!

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Young People

It's a commonly used phrase that describes innocent statements into an explicit one.

"I want you to think about it long and hard." "That's what she said." - The Office

Confirmed by 2 people

English South East, United States

Bless your heart

Expression USED Frequently BY Mostly women in the Southern USA

To someone from outside it sounds like a compliment but it is really a polite way to say “you’re an idiot”. Can also be used at the end of a rude sentence to try to end the sentence on a “positive” note.

“Someone called saying I won a cruise and all I have to do is give them my bank information! Time for a trip!” “Oh honey, bless your heart”.

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English Canada, United States

thanks, Captain Obvious

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

Used sarcastically when someone points out the obvious. Can be used in jest between friends or scathingly sarcastic as an insult.

“The sign says “pull” the door open.” “Thanks, Captain Obvious!”

Confirmed by 3 people

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æ

English Midwest, United States

ope

Interjection USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(interj.) • Interjection used to indicate surprise and/or mild disappointment. Frequently followed by the word “well.”

“Ope, well, guess we can’t see the movie anymore” *gets bumped into by someone* “ope, watch yourself!“ “Ope, well, then I guess I don’t know, then”

English United States

the Rona

Reference USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) • A female name used to refer to the corona virus.

“Did you hear they canceled classes cause of the Rona?”

Confirmed by 3 people

English United States

pop

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • A sparkling drink.

"What pop would you like, ma'am?" "A root beer, please."

Confirmed by 4 people

English United States

to drink the Kool-Aid

Reference USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

When someone has been persuaded to join a cause due to peer pressure. Meaning a persuasive personality has gotten you to believe in their cause. Usually has a negative connotation. This is a reference to the Jonestown mass suicide of 1978 when a cult leader mixed cyanide in Kool-Aid and had his followers drink it.

“Did you see Sue today?” “Yeah, she really drank the Kool-aid didn’t she?”

Confirmed by 3 people

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English United States

kek

Sound USED On Occasion BY Millenials

Translation of the acronym "LOL" (laugh out loud) when reading text written by members of the Horde faction as an Alliance player in the online multiplayer game World of Warcraft (WoW). The use of this term spread throughout the rest of the internet during the height of WoW's popularity, used in place of 'lol'.

"This is a funny joke." "kek"

Confirmed by 2 people

English United States

SNAFU

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Military

An acronym that is widely used to stand for the sarcastic expression 'Situation Normal: All Fucked Up'. It is a well-known example of military acronym slang. It means that the situation is bad, but that this is a normal state of affairs. The acronym is believed to have originated in the United States Marine Corps during World War II.

"What's the current situation in there?" "It's a real SNAFU. Everything is literally on fire." "So, same as usual."

Confirmed by 3 people

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English United States

flip-flop

Slang USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • (1) No-heel-strap sandal. It is an onomatopoeia of the sound made by the sandals when walking in them. Also known as a 'thong' in Austrailian English. (2) To be indecisive when making a decision; To come to a different conclusion (repeatedly); This is often seen as a negative trait in politics.

(1) "I'm going to the beach." "Don't forget to pack your flip-flops." (2) "First you were pro-gun control. Now you're against it. How can we trust you in office if you keep wanting to flip-flop on the issues?"

Confirmed by 4 people

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English Southern States, United States

the devil's beating his wife

Expression USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

A phrase that means 'it is raining while not overcast, so the sun is still visible, and it is bright outside despite the rain'.

"Take a look out the window and tell me what the weather's like." "The devil's beating his wife." "Hopefully it'll clear up soon; I forgot my umbrella."

Confirmed by 2 people

English United States

ride shotgun

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Young People

To ride in the front passenger seat of a vehicle. To ride shotgun is the goal of the game "calling shotgun", where people try to claim this front seat first. Possibly derived from film depictions of stagecoaches, where the person riding next to the driver would carry a shotgun.

"Riley rode shotgun the last time we drove to the park; now, it's my turn!"

Confirmed by 7 people

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English United States

legit

Slang USED Very frequently BY Teens

(adj.) • Short for “legitimate”. Used like “cool.” Meaning new, exciting, in fashion, etc.

"Your coat is legit”

Confirmed by 13 people

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English United States

dope

Slang USED Frequently BY Teens

(adj.) • Used the same way as “cool.”

“Did you see my new AirPods?” “Dude! Those are so dope!”

Confirmed by 13 people

English New York, United States

in the street

Slang USED Very frequently BY ex inmates

It's slang for "in the free world", "out of prison".

"Now that I've been in the street for 7 years, I've accomplished many things."

English Greendale, United States

streets ahead

Reference USED On Occasion BY people at Greendale Community College

If you have to ask, you're streets behind.

Pierce: "Abed, your social skills aren't exactly streets ahead."

Confirmed by 8 people