German Germany

Mein lieber Herr Gesangsverein

Expression USED On Occasion BY Native speakers, rather older

(my dear Mr. Singing Club) • Used if you want to express that something is rather extreme. It is an outcry to certain situations. It translates word for word to "my dear Mr. Singing Club". I do t know the exact origin, but I always connect it to possibly extreme volumes and shouting or singing of male singing clubs.

"Hast du gesehen, welche Niederlage die Bayern im letzten Spiel erlitten hat?" "Mein lieber Herr Gesangsverein, das war aufregend."

“Did you see the defeat Bayern suffered in the last game?” “My dear Mr. Singing Club, that was nasty.”

German Germany

den Teufel an die Wand malen

Idiom USED Frequently BY Older people

(to paint the devil on the wal) • When we assume the worst of a situation before anything has even happened. It can be discouraged to say - don't anticipate awful things or they will happen.

"Kommt ein andere Krieg gleich." "Mal den Teufel nicht and den Wand malen."

“Another war is about to happen.” “Don’t paint the devil on the wall.”

German Germany, Switzerland, Austria

doch

Word USED Very frequently BY everybody

It means "No, you are wrong and I am right" in one word.

"Hier darf man nicht schneller als 50 Meilen fahren!“ "Doch!"

"You cannot drive faster than 50 miles here!" "Yes, you can!"

German Berlin, Germany

jwd

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Everybody

Short for "janz weit draußen" (well out there). Something far away, difficult to access because it is far outside.

"Der Laden ist jwd."

"The supermarket is far away."

German Germany

0815

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Means something is very low quality.

"This password is 0815"

German Germany

Verömmeln

Slang USED On Occasion BY Middle aged folks

To fail at something, to screw something up, to lose something, or to screw someone over.

"Ich wollte die Zündkerzen tauschen, aber ich habe es verömmelt."

"I wanted to change the spark plugs but I messed it up."

German Germany

Jubelperser

Expression USED On Occasion BY Mostly people who have been politically interested in the 60s

(cheering-Persians) • A claqeur, a person who has been paid to applaud or cheer for someone. Mostly used as an insult to insinuate someone either does not have their own opinion or would not have real support by the audience. The term appeared in 1967 when the Shah of Iran visited Berlin and had intelligence agents cheer at the road and beat up protesters.

"Das Publikum war voller Jubelperser. "

"The audience was full of cheering-Persians. "

syn

German Germany

Alter

Word USED On Occasion BY Teens, young people

(old one) • Used to address a (usually familiar or close) person as you would call someone "dude" or "bro" in English, regardless of their actual age.

"Alles klar, Alter?" "Alter, was laberst du?" "Was geht, Alter?"

alt

German Germany

08/15

Expression USED Frequently BY Everybody

Something made cheaply and in a generic way, in a way that this thing is not really reliable; stems from the 08/15 machine gun the German army used in Ww1 (users of this expression usually don’t know this)

"That is some 08/15 lighter, it usually gets the job done of lighting my cigarette "

æ

German Germany

plemplem

Word USED Very frequently BY Everybody

Crazy, deranged, insane.

„Der isst Pizza mit Ananas!“ "Der ist ja plemplem.“

“He’s eating pizza with pineapple!” — “He's insane.”

Germany Germany

Sitzpinkler

Name USED On Occasion BY Everybody

(seat peeer) • A man who sits down when peeing.

"Der ist so ein Sitzpinkler"

"He is such a seat peeer."

syn

German Germany

Weltenbummler

Neologism USED On Occasion BY Everybody

(world stroller) • People who travel the world, looking for adventures, without a specific destination. Welten means worlds and a bummler somebody who wanders around. 'Bummeln' is to stroll around, or wander around.

"Sie liebt es die Welt zu erkunden. Sie ist eine wahre Weltenbummlerin."

"She loves it the world to explore. She is a true Weltenbummlerin."

German Hamburg, Germany

Schietwetter

Slang USED Frequently BY Everybody

(Shitweather) • It's the word for the really shitty weather you encounter in the Northern parts of Germany - rain, more rain, and strong winds that even your best umbrella can't protect you from.

"Dieses Schietwetter mag ich nicht."

"This Schietwetter like I not."

syn

æ

German Germany

Späti

Word USED Very frequently BY Everybody

(noun) • (Late-y) • Little shops that sell snacks, alcohol, ice cream, chewing gum and random other things like milk or mulled wine, the list goes on. They are called Späti because they're open until late.

"Berlin ist berühmt für seine Spätis."

"Berlin is famous for its Spätis."

German Germany

KiBa

Name USED Frequently BY Everybody

An acronym and simultaneously the name for a juice where cherry (Kirsch) juice is mixed with banana (Banane) juice. It's Ki from Kirsch and Ba from Banane that form KiBa. It's tasty and looks beautiful! First pour the banana juice, then the cherry to get a beautiful juice pattern.

"Ich trinke gerne KiBa."

"I drink gladly KiBa."

æ

German German speaking countries

selbstverständlich

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(adj.) • (selfunderstandable) • This adjective refers to something so obvious that anybody can understand or accept it; you don't need to ask. The noun is Selbstverständlichkeit.

"Kannst du mir helfen?" "Ja, selbstverständlich!" "Ein Baby kann man nicht allein zu Hause lassen. Das ist doch selbstverständlich."

"Can you help me?" "Yes, selfunderstandable" "You can't leave a baby alone at home. That's just selfunderstandable."

German Germany

Aprilwetter

Expression USED Frequently BY everybody

(April-weather) • It's not so much the weather in April, more so a concept of weather that changes within seconds: One minute it's sunny, and the next it's hailing. Even though it is mostly used in the month of April, it can be used any day of the year when the weather is super unpredictable.

"Heute ist ja richtiges Aprilwetter!"

"Such April-weather we're having today!"

German German speaking countries

Siebkopf

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(sieve head) • Someone who tends to forget everything

"Hab ich dir gestern noch erzählt, du Siebkopf!"

"I just told you yesterday, you sieve head!"

Confirmed by 2 people

syn

alt

German German speaking countries

Flüssigbrot

Word USED Frequently BY Adults

(noun) • (liquid bread) • A way of saying ‘beer’ in a joking manner, referring to the fact that both beer and bread are made of wheat.

„In Bayern gibts das beste Flüssigbrot!“

“In Bavaria there's the best liquid bread!”

Confirmed by 2 people

German German speaking countries

nah am Wasser gebaut

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(built close to the water) • Somebody who cries easily.

"Susi ist nah am Wasser gebaut - sie weint bei jedem Film."

"Susi is built close to the water - she cries during every movie."

Confirmed by 3 people