English The South, United States

nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

Idiom USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

Used to describe someone who is nervous. The imagery is that a cat with a long tail would be in constant danger of having its tail crushed under the moving chairs in a room full of rocking chairs

“Did you get to see her before she gets on stage?” “Yes, she’s nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs, but I think she’ll be great.”

Italian In the South, Italy

A chi appartieni?

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(Who do you belong to? ) • Question any elder Southern Italian asks when meeting someone younger than them for the first time in order to know which family they belong to and/or who their parents and grandparents are.

“Giovanotto, a chi appartieni?” “Sono figlio del dottor Rossi.”

“Who do you belong to, young boy?” “I’m dr. Rossi’s son.”

English The South, United States

butter my butt and call me a biscuit!

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Older Generations

"I can't believe it!" or "oh my goodness!"

"They're getting a new manager to lead bingo at the senior center!" "Well butter my butt and call me a biscuit!"

Confirmed by 12 people