ety

English English speaking countries

mentrification

Neologism USED On Rare Occasion BY women

When a field of interest of women is taken over by men, subsequently pushing out the women who were previously there.

"Computer science used to be filled with women until men came in and mentrified the field."

Confirmed by 3 people

English English speaking countries

stan

Word USED Frequently BY Gen Z'ers

Can be used as a noun or a verb to describe an obsessive love of a celebrity. Used frequently on Twitter. Originates from Eminem's song 'Stan', which tells the story of one of his obsessive fans.

"She really stans BTS." "She's a big Taylor Swift stan."

Confirmed by 6 people

English English speaking countries

shrapnel

Word USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(n.) • Coins or loose change. Reference to coins being small pieces of metal, like shrapnel.

"Have you got enough shrapnel for the parking meter?"

English English speaking countries

loml

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Gen Z'ers

(n.) • An acronym for 'love of my life'. Often used on Instagram as a caption for a picture of your partner.

"Look at him. #loml"

English English speaking countries

to throw someone in at the deep end

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(v.) • To put someone into a new situation without enough preparation or introduction. Refers to the deep end of a swimming pool.

"They really threw me in at the deep end but I'm getting used to it now."

syn

English English speaking countries

baptism of fire

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

Immediately having to cope with a stressful situation in order to improve.

"How was your first driving lesson?" "It was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed it."

English English speaking countries

hangry

Portmanteau USED On Occasion BY Most People

(adj.) • To be angry or irritated because of hunger.

"Can you hurry up? I'm starting to get hangry."

alt

English English speaking countries

buy-cott

Word USED On Rare Occasion BY People Opposing Protests

(n.) • Going out of your way to buy from a certain brand that has been boycotted.

“I’ve been buying a lot of t-shirts as part of a buy-cott to save a local business from going under”

Confirmed by 7 people

æ

English English speaking countries

a little birdie told me

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some people

This idiom is used playfully not to reveal the source of information about something. Usually, however, the source of the information is obvious. Sometimes rendered as 'A little bird told me'

"How did you know it was my birthday?" "Let's just say a little birdie told me!"

Confirmed by 25 people

English English speaking countries

to yap on

Word USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(v.) • Used when someone keeps talking on and on, without meaning and without sign of stopping

"And then this happened.." "Stop yapping on and get to the point!"

Confirmed by 8 people

English English speaking countries

fomo

Acronym USED Frequently BY Young People

Stands for Fear of Missing Out.

"I decided to stay in on Friday night but when I saw the pictures the next day I had major fomo."

Confirmed by 11 people

alt

English English speaking countries

byob

Acronym USED On Occasion BY Most People

Stands for Bring Your Own Beer/Booze. Often found on party invitations or restaurants to indicate that you are welcome to bring your own drinks with you.

"Can we stop at the shop on the way to the party? It's a BYOB kind of thing."

Confirmed by 12 people

English English speaking countries

to make a mountain out of a molehill

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

To make a mountain out of a molehill is to treat a minor problem as something major. Used when somebody is exaggerating.

“I was only 10 minutes late! You’re making a mountain out of a molehill.” “You’re making a mountain out a molehill, you failed one test, it doesn’t mean you’ll fail the whole year”

Confirmed by 2 people

English English speaking countries

in a pickle

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

Means that you are in a difficult position with no easy solution.

"I'm in a bit of a pickle - the deadline is tomorrow and my computer just broke."

English English speaking countries

to carry a torch for someone

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

To admire or love somebody in secret. Comes from the metaphor of a burning flame, i.e. to keep a fire burning.

"She's always carried a torch for him, maybe they'll get back together one day."

English English speaking countries

humblebrag

Portmanteau USED On Occasion BY Millenials

(n.) • A modest or self-deprecating statement that has the actual intention of drawing attention to something the speaker is proud of.

"He was complaining about having too many job offers to choose from." "What a humblebrag!"

English English speaking countries

ok, boomer

Expression USED On Occasion BY Millenials

(interj.) • Used in a humorous or ironic manner to dismiss closed-minded opinions from the baby boomer generation (people born between 1946 and 1965) and older people more generally. Often used when someone's opinion is so out-of-touch that it would take too long to explain something to them.

"If you just stopped eating avocado toast, you'd be able to afford a house in no time." "Ok, boomer."

English English speaking countries

keep your chin up

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Used to encourage someone to remain positive.

"Have you heard back from the job yet?" "No." "Well, keep your chin up, you'll hear soon!"

Confirmed by 10 people

English English speaking countries

wdy?

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Young People

Used when texting, short for ''what do you do?''.

''Hey! Wdy?''

Confirmed by 5 people

alt

English England, English speaking countries

moolah

Slang USED Frequently BY Quite common, a lot originate from cockney rhyming slang

Expressions related to money used in England: *a quid (a pound) *lady godiva/deep sea diver(£5) *a pony (£25) *a ton (£100) *a monkey (£500) *a grand (£1000)

"Give us the moolah!"

"Give us the money!"

Confirmed by 2 people