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English Australia

the Rona

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • Aussies often refer to coronavirus as the Rona, or just Rona. We abbreviate/shorten so many words, guess it's not a surprise we've shortened this too.

"Steve caught The Rona when he went overseas so now he's in isolation for two weeks".

Confirmed by 7 people

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Sardinian | Ogliastran Sardinia, Italy

minch'e cuaddu

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

(penis of a horse) • Exclamation used after receiving a surprising information.

"Oi appu comporau su pani, e m'esti costau dexi eurus." "Minch'e cuaddu!"

"Today I bought some bread and it cost me ten euros." "Penis of a horse!"

French French speaking countries

voilà voilà

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Most People

When you finish telling something that might be awkward, sad or another quite negative feeling, you often end the story with "voilà voilà". The use and tone is different from the enthusiastic "voilà!".

"Hier, je marchais dans la rue tout en buvant mon café, et j'ai glissé sur une peau de banane. Je suis tombé et j'ai renversé mon café très chaud sur moi. Malheureusement, la rue était bondée, donc tout le monde m'a vu tomber. Voilà voilà..."

"Yesterday, I was walking down the street while drinking my coffee, and I slipped on a banana peel. I fell and spilled my very hot coffee on myself. Unfortunately, the street was crowded, so everyone saw me falling. So there you go..."

Confirmed by 10 people

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French French speaking countries

pognon

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • Money.

"Tu peux me prêter un peu de pognon stp?"

"Can you lend me some money please?"

Confirmed by 6 people

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German | Austrian Austria

servus

Interjection USED Frequently BY Most People

(interj.) • It is a way of saying hello and/or bye that's only used in informal settings (e.g. with friends or family).

"Servus! Wie geht's? Lange nicht mehr gesehen!"

"Hi! How are you? Long time no see!"

Confirmed by 4 people

Polish Poland

guzik prawda!

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Most People

(button truth) • An expression used when the speaker strongly disagrees with a statement.

"Pieniądze szczęścia nie dają." "Guzik prawda!"

"Money can't buy happiness." "Button truth!"

Confirmed by 3 people

French French speaking countries

avoir un cheveu sur la langue

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(to have a hair on one's tongue) • To lisp.

"J'ai l'impression que beaucoup d'enfants ont un cheveu sur la langue quand ils parlent."

"It seems that many children have a lisp when they speak."

Confirmed by 6 people

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Polish Poland

Francja elegancja

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

(France elegance) • Expression used to describe something extremely elegant and awe-inspiring. It can also be used sarcastically to describe something pretentious.

"Nawet ma swoje własne kino domowe. Francja elegancja!"

"He even has his own home theater. France elegance!"

Confirmed by 3 people

French French speaking countries

se prendre un vent

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(to take oneself a wind) • Used when someone is being ignored when saying something. "Vent" (= wind) stands for the sound it makes, so the only answer that the person gets. Sometimes, you can replace "vent" by "tornade", "tsunami", "ouragan", etc. which are stronger kinds of wind, so a stronger silence after one's words.

Personne 1 -"Ça vous dit de venir manger chez moi ce soir?" Personne 2 - Pas de réaction. Personne 3 (à personne 1) - "Tu viens de te prendre un de ces vents!"

Person 1 - "Would you like to come and eat at my place tonight?" Person 2 - No reaction. Person 3 (to person 1) - "You've just taken yourself one of those winds!"

Confirmed by 3 people

English Cork, Ireland

allergic

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

(adj.) • Being allergic means not wanting to do a thing or disliking an activity.

"I'm supposed to paint the fence, and I'm allergic."

Confirmed by 3 people

German | Schnürlesregen (Swabian) Germany

es regnet Bindfäden

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(it's raining strings) • Used to refer to constant pouring rain, so strong that you can't see separate droplets anymore.

"Nimm einen Schirm mit, es regnet heute Bindfäden."

"Take an umbrella with you, it's raining strings today."

Confirmed by 3 people

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French Poitou-Charentes, Normandy, France

barrer

Word USED Very frequently BY Most people

(v.) • To lock a door. It comes from the time you used a bar to keep a door closed.

"T'as barré la porte ?"

"Did you lock the door?"

Confirmed by 2 people

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English United Kingdom

It’s chucking it down

Expression USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used for very heavy rain, or rain that has come on very suddenly.

“Would you look at the rain? It’s chucking it down now!”

Confirmed by 4 people

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Dutch Netherlands

frisje

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • (little fresh) • A combination of the Dutch word for soda, "frisdrank" (freshdrink), and the Dutch national pastime of using words in their diminutive form. It's a way of asking for a soda, without specifying which one you actually want. This is usually followed by a brief discussion where the person asking for the "little fresh" is still forced to make a decision about which soda they actually would like to have.

"Kan ik iets te drinken inschenken?" "Ja, doe mij maar een frisje." "Oké, we hebben cola, fanta, rivella..." "Doe maar cola."

"Can I pour you something to drink?" "Yes, you can do me a little fresh." "Okay, we have coke, fanta, rivella..." "Do me a coke then."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

Å skjære alle over én kam

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

(To cut everyone with the same comb) • To judge, evalue or treat all people in a group the same way without taking any (individual) differences into account.

"Svensker er ubrukelige til å gå på ski." "Nå må du ikke skjære alle over én kam."

"Swedes are useless at skiing." "You shouldn't cut everyone with the same comb."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

sa brura

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

(said the bride) • The Norwegian equivalent of "that's what she said".

"Jøss, den var større enn jeg trodde." "Sa brura!"

"Wow, it's bigger than I thought." "Said the bride!"

Confirmed by 2 people

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English Lancashire , England

ey up

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

Commonly used as a greeting.

“Ey up! How’s things?”

Confirmed by 7 people

German Switzerland

bünzli

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(n.) • A "bünzli" is a person who follows rules at all times and wants others to follow them, too. It's usually also associated with people of higher socioeconomic status or older people. It has a partial overlap in meaning with the English slang term "Karen" in that a "bünzli" will also talk to a manager (or some kind of higher official) if something isn't done their way.

"Mi nochber isch sone bünzli. Är het gest dr polizei aglüte weil mr am 22:30 ufem balkon musik glost hän."

"My neighbor is such a bünzli. He called the police yesterday because we were listening to music on our balcony at 10:30pm."

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Dutch Netherlands

boven water

Expression USED Frequently BY Most People

(above water) • Something that was lost or hidden that has now been found again.

"Zijn de belastingpapieren al weer boven water?"

"Are the tax papers above water again?"

Confirmed by 4 people

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Scots Scotland

tae greet

Word USED On Occasion BY Most People

(v.) • Meaning 'to cry'

"Shut yer weesht an stop yer greetin ye eejit!"

"Shut up and stop crying, you idiot"

Confirmed by 4 people