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Portuguese Brazil

está chovendo canivetes

Expression USED On Occasion BY anyone

(it's raining pocketknives) • Used to describe heavy, stinging rainfall.

"Não vá lá para fora. Está chovendo canivetes."

"Don't go out there. It's raining pocketknives."

Confirmed by 3 people

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Portuguese Brazil

está chovendo canivete

Expression USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(it's raining penknives) • It is an expression to say that it is raining a lot.

"Hoje tá chovendo canivete!"

"Today it's raining penknives!"

Confirmed by 3 people

Portuguese Brazil

Maria vai com as outras

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(Mary goes with the others) • Used to describe someone who is easily influenced by the the opinion of others, with no will of their own.

''Ele não opinião sobre nada, na hora de decidir, ele é Maria vai com as outras.''

''He doesn't have opinion about anything, when it's time to decide, he is Mary goes with the others.''

Confirmed by 4 people

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Portuguese Brazil

filhinho de papai

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

(daddy's little kid) • Someone who is spoiled and rich. It's used to refer to posh, bourgeois, cocky and pretentious people.

"Ele não sabe o que é trabalho, é um filhinho de papai."

"He doesn't know what's work, he's daddy's little kid."

Confirmed by 5 people

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Portuguese Brazil

estar na pindaíba

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

To be miserable, in a penniless situation. It's used in a fun context.

"Esse mês eu estou na pindaíba."

"This month I'm penniless."

Confirmed by 3 people

Portuguese Brazil

bafafá

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(n.) • A discussion, a mess or a gossip. Something related to confusion, tension and rumours.

"Tá rolando o maior bafafá lá na feira."

"There's a huge bafafá happening in the market."

Confirmed by 3 people

alt

Portuguese Southwest, Minas Gerais, Brazil

custoso

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(adj.) • (costly, irksome) • It refers to a difficult person, someone who gives you a hard time or is high-maintenance. It's often used to refer to bratty, spoiled children.

"Mas que menino custoso!"

"What an irksome boy!"

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Portuguese Brazil

onde judas perdeu as botas

Idiom USED Frequently BY Everyone

(where Judas lost his boots.) • It refers to a very distant place. It's often used when the place seems to be far from everywhere, like the outskirts of a city, a remote town or a deserted neighborhood.

"Eu não vou nesse lugar, é lá onde Judas perdeu as botas."

"I'm not going to this place, it's there where Judas lost his boots."

Confirmed by 2 people

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alt

Portuguese Southwest, Brazil

imagina

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) • (imagine) • It is equivalent to "not at all", being used as a polite yet informal answer to "thank you". It expresses that the other person should not even imagine giving thanks because it was a no-brainer or an easy task.

"Obrigado pela carona!" "Imagina! Foi um prazer!"

"Thanks for the ride!" "Imagine! It was a pleasure!"

Confirmed by 3 people

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Portuguese Brazil

a vida não é um mar de rosas

Expression USED On Occasion BY Everyone

(life isn't a sea of roses) • A colloquial way of saying that life is not easy.

"Você achou que seria fácil? A vida não é um mar de rosas!"

"Did you think it would be easy? Life isn't a sea of roses!"

Confirmed by 6 people

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Portuguese Brazil

mano

Slang USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • A common way to call a friend used in São Paulo, Brazil.

"E aí mano."

"What's up, bro"

Confirmed by 5 people

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Portuguese São Paulo, Brazil

parça

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

Way to call a friend, abbreviation of "parceiro" which means "buddy".

"E aí parça."

"What's up bud."

Confirmed by 5 people