padají trakaře*

* wheelbarrows are falling

Czech Czechia

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY everybody

This phrase means that it is raining a lot, it is also used when there is a storm outside.

"Nechoď dnes ven, padají trakaře!"

"Don't go outside today, the wheelbarrows are falling!"





cheers drive

English | Bristolian Bristol, United Kingdom

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

A greeting to express thanks to a bus driver when getting of the bus

"Cheers drive! Have a good day!"


Confirmed by 2 people




to je jedno*

* it is one

Slovak Slovakia

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

I don't care. I don't mind. It doesn't matter.

"Dáš si pivo alebo víno?" "To je jedno."

"Would you like a beer or wine?" "It is one."





čuditi se kao pura dreku*

* to be surprised like a turkey by its own shit

Croatian | Kajkavian northern Croatia, Croatia

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Everyone

To be surprised by something that shouldn't come off as a surprise.

''What did you expect would happen? Why are you now surprised like a turkey by its own shit?''

''A kaj si mislio da će se dogoditi? Kaj se čudiš kao pura dreku sada?''





syn

pogoda pod psem*

* the weather under the dog

Polish Poland

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

Very bad weather

"I stayed at home yesterday, the weather was under the dog."

"Zostałam wczoraj w domu, pogoda była pod psem."





syn

donde Judas dejó el caite*

* where Judas left his sandal

Spanish Guatemala

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

Used to indicate a place very far away.

"Él vive hasta donde Judas dejó el caite."

"He lives where Judas left his sandal."





ga toch fietsen*

* go ride a bike

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

A way of telling someone to go away or to stop being ridiculous.

"10 euro voor een biertje? Ga toch fietsen."

"10 euro for a beer? Go ride a bike."





bekijk het maar

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

A way to say that you can forget about it and that whatever was suggested is not going to happen.

"Vijf euro voor een biertje? Bekijk het maar."

"Five euros for a beer? Look at it."


Confirmed by 2 people




that's what she said!

English United States

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Young People

It's a commonly used phrase that describes innocent statements into an explicit one.

"I want you to think about it long and hard." "That's what she said." - The Office





niets meer aan doen*

* nothing more to do

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Most People

A phrase often used when something is perfect, and there is nothing that should be changed about it.

"Hoe zit m'n haar?" "Top, niks meer aan doen."

"How's my hair?" "Great, nothing more to do."


Confirmed by 3 people




alt

die Augen waren größer als der Bauch*

* the eyes were bigger than the belly

German Germany

Standard Phrase USED On Rare Occasion BY Mostly middle aged people

Usually used when someone bought or put more food on their plate than they could eat because they were hungry and therefore thought they could eat more than they actually could. It can be an accusation that they wasted food.

„Das kann ich nicht mehr essen, ich bin so satt!“ „Deine Augen waren größer als dein Bauch.“

„I can't eat that anymore, I’m so full!“ „Your eyes were bigger than your belly.“


Confirmed by 3 people




de drukte opzoeken*

* to look for the hustle and bustle

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

To go to spaces with loads of people, e.g. bars, malls, etc.

"Tijdens Corona is het onverantwoord om de drukte op te zoeken."

"During Corona, it's irresponsible to go looking for the hustle and bustle."


Confirmed by 2 people




tot en met*

* till and with

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Up to and including.

"Voor volgende week moeten jullie tot en met hoofdstuk 5 lezen."

"For next week you need to read till and with chapter 5."


Confirmed by 3 people




alt

goed bezig*

* good busy

Dutch Netherlands

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Everyone

A way of saying "well done" or "good job" or "you are doing well". Alternatively, you'll hear "lekker bezig" with the same meaning, but more often used ironically.

"Ik ben al bijna 10 kilo afgevallen sinds het begin van het jaar." "Goed bezig!"

"I've nearly lost 10 kilo's since the beginning of the year." "Good busy!"


Confirmed by 4 people




Cofiwch Dryweryn*

* Remember Tryweryn

Welsh Wales

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

'Cofiwch Dryweryn' is the phrase used to bring attention to the drowning of the Welsh town Capel Celyn in 1965. The act of the town being turned into a water reservoir for the English city of Liverpool forms a large part of the animosity between the two countries.

Note: The 'T' of Tryweryn mutates to a 'D' (as seen in the submission) due to the soft mutation that comes with an imperative noun.

"Yn y dyfodol, mae'r Saesneg wedi achosi llawer o gur am Gymru." "Dw i'n cytuno gyda ti - cofiwch Dryweryn!"

"In the past, the English have caused a lot of pain for Wales." "I agree with you - remember Tryweryn!"