flipper

French French speaking countries

Slang USED Very frequently BY Mainly young people

(v.) To be scared.

"J'ai un entretien d'embauche demain, je flippe tellement !"

"I have a job interview tomorrow, I'm so scared !"


Confirmed by 2 people




bouche-trou*

* hole-filler

French French speaking countries

Word USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) It describes a person used as a replacement of another person in a group.

"Elle a parfois l'impression d'être le bouche-trou de la bande ; elle est invitée à manger ou faire la fête avec eux seulement quand ça les arrangent."

"She sometimes has the feeling of being the group hole-filler; she's invited to eat or party with them only when it suits them."


Confirmed by 7 people




alt

saigner des yeux*

* to bleed from the eyes

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used when you see or hear something very unpleasant.

Note: saigner des oreilles (example): "Quant à moi, je saigne des oreilles dès que cette chanteuse passe à la radio." "As for me, I bleed from the ears as soon as this singer is aired on radio."

"Je saigne des yeux à chaque fois que je lis ses messages : il fait tellement de fautes d'orthographes!"

"I bleed from the eyes whenever I read his messages: he does so many spelling mistakes!"


Confirmed by 6 people




se prendre un râteau *

* to take oneself a rake

French French speaking countries

Expression USED Frequently BY People Under 30

Used when you tell someone that you like him/her and (s)he doesn't like you back. When you are the one whose feelings are hurt, you "take yourself a rake". When you are the one who hurts the other person's feelings, you "give a rake" (mettre un râteau).

"Je me suis pris un râteau hier... Je lui ai dit que je l'aimais bien et il m'a répondu : "Désolé, t'es pas mon type"."

"I took myself a rake yesterday... I told him that I liked him and he replied: "Sorry, you're not my type"."


Confirmed by 5 people




voilà voilà

French French speaking countries

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Most People

When you finish telling something that might be awkward, sad or another quite negative feeling, you often end the story with "voilà voilà". The use and tone is different from the enthusiastic "voilà!".

"Hier, je marchais dans la rue tout en buvant mon café, et j'ai glissé sur une peau de banane. Je suis tombé et j'ai renversé mon café très chaud sur moi. Malheureusement, la rue était bondée, donc tout le monde m'a vu tomber. Voilà voilà..."

"Yesterday, I was walking down the street while drinking my coffee, and I slipped on a banana peel. I fell and spilled my very hot coffee on myself. Unfortunately, the street was crowded, so everyone saw me falling. So there you go..."


Confirmed by 7 people




syn

prendre ses jambes à son cou*

* to take you legs to your neck

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Adults

To run away as fast as possible.

"A chaque fois que Bip Bip voit Coyote, il prend ses jambes à con cou."

"Whenever the Road Runner sees Wile E. Coyote, he takes his legs to his neck."


Confirmed by 5 people




syn

prendre la poudre d'escampette

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Adults

To run away, to flee.

Note: This expression is old-fashioned.

"Hier, ma maison a été cambriolée, et au moment où je cherchais les voleurs, ils avaient déjà pris la poudre d'escampette."

"Yesterday, my house was robbed, and when I looked for the thieves, they had already fled."


Confirmed by 5 people




æ

avoir été bercé trop près du mur*

* to have been rocked too close to the wall

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Adults

It's a way to say that a person is stupid. By being rocked near a wall, a baby's head could be bumped and cause damage to the brain.

"Jenny, un des personages de la BD "Les Nombrils", a été bercé trop très du mur. Je n'ai jamais vu quelqu'un d'aussi débile mais tellement drôle!"

"Jenny, one of the "The Bellybuttons" comic characters, was rocked too close to the wall. I've never seen a person that stupid but so funny!"


Confirmed by 5 people




ne pas être fût-fût*

* not to be clever-clever

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used to refer to a dumb person or a person doing stupid things, but it's lighter than saying that a person is stupid. It comes from "fûté", that means "clever".

"Cette fille n'est vraiment pas fût-fût; elle pense que les lions sont des animaux marins!"

"That girl really isn't clever-clever; she thinks that lions are marine animals!"


Confirmed by 4 people




avoir la tête dans le cul*

* to have the head in the butt

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

It means to be feeling hazy, tired or not feeling that well.

"J'ai la tête dans le cul ce matin: j'ai à peine dormi de la nuit."

"I have the head in the butt this morning: I've barely slept this night."


Confirmed by 5 people




syn

pognon

French French speaking countries

Slang USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) Money.

"Tu peux me prêter un peu de pognon stp?"

"Can you lend me some money please?"


Confirmed by 4 people




syn

oseille*

* sorrel

French French speaking countries

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(n.) Money.

"J'ai grave besoin d'oseille!"

"I really need sorrel!"


Confirmed by 4 people




être le vilain petit canard*

* to be the bad little duckling

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

Refers to a person who is disliked by other people and left aside because (s)he is (physically, morally, etc) different from the others.

"Cet enfant est le vilain petit canard de sa classe ; tout le monde se moque de lui parce qu'il boite."

"This child is the bad little duckling of his class; everyone laughs at him because he has a limp."


Confirmed by 5 people




être comme chien et chat*

* to be like dog and cat

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

Used to describe people who are constantly in conflict, like cats and dogs, that are believed to dislike each other.

"Ma soeur en moi sommes comme chien et chat : il est impossible pour nous de s'entendre plus de quelques minutes. Nous nous disputons tout le temps."

"My sister and I are like dog and cat: it's impossible for us to get along more than a few minutes. We are always arguing."


Confirmed by 6 people




On ne trouve pas l'argent sous les sabots d'un cheval*

* Money can't be found under a horse's hoof

French French speaking countries

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Money doesn't grow on trees.

Note: This variation of the expression is used to talk about money specifically. The more general expression "ça ne se trouve pas sous les sabots d'un cheval" (translation: "it can't be found under a horse's hoof") can be used to express that something is rare and valuable.

"Je ne peux pas t'acheter ce sac, il est beaucoup trop cher ! Tu penses qu'on trouve l'argent sous les sabots d'un cheval?"

"I can't buy you this bag, it's way too expensive! Do you think money can be found under a horse's hoof?"


Confirmed by 4 people