Spanish Venezuela

quedarse sin el chivo y sin el mecate

Expression USED Frequently BY Gen Y, Gen X and Older Gen

(to be left without the goat and without the rope) • Having two options and ending up not having either.

''Porque no tomaste una desición a tiempo, te quedaste sin el chivo y sin el mecate.''

''Because you didn't make a decision in time, you're left without the goat and without the rope.''

Confirmed by 2 people

Spanish Venezuela

mango bajito

Expression USED On Occasion BY Gen X, Gen Z and Olders

(low mango) • Something is low mango when is easy to get or is a good opportunity.

''Aprovecha esa oferta! Es un mango bajito!''

''Take advantage of that offer! That is a low mango!''

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Spain

tirar fichas

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(to throw tokens) • Used to say that someone is trying to seduce another person.

"¡Parece un casino de todas la fichas que tira!"

"He looks like a casino for all the tokens he throws!"

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Spain

tirarse a alguien

Slang USED Frequently BY Teens

(to throw someone) • Informal way of saying 'to have sexual relations' with someone.

"¿Entonces te le tiraste?"

"So you have throw him?"

Confirmed by 5 people

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Spanish Spanish speaking countries

tq

Abbreviation USED Frequently BY Teens

Abbreviation of 'te quiero' (I love you) used when texting.

"Buenas noches! Tq"

"Good night! Ily"

Confirmed by 5 people

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Spanish Spain

llover a cántaros

Idiom USED Frequently BY Adults

(it's raining pitchers) • This idiom is used when it is raining a lot.

"¡Llueve a cántaros!"

"It's raining pitchers!"

Confirmed by 5 people

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Spanish Spain

como quien oye llover

Expression USED On Occasion BY Adults

(like who hears rain) • The expression is used by the person who is talking when someone is not listening to them.

"No me escucha cuando hablo, es como quien oye llover."

"He don't listen to me when I'm talking, it's like who hears rain."

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Spain

¡Ostras!

Interjection USED Frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) • (Oysters!) • Used when something is surprising. Like "damn!".

"Mi trabajo me despidió hoy." "¡Ostras!"

"I got fired today." "Oysters!"

Spanish Puerto Rico

Está lloviendo a cántaros

Expression USED On Occasion BY Adults

It's the equal for the English version of "pouring" when it's raining. A "cántaro" is a big clay pitcher, used to store great amounts of water.

"¿Está lloviendo hoy?" "Sí, a cántaros."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Spanish Venezuela

catire

Word USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(adj.) • Common way to refer to blond people.

"Me gustan las mujeres catiras."

"I like blond girls."

Confirmed by 2 people

Spanish Spanish speaking countries

chévere

Slang USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(adj.) • Slang used in a few countries of Latin America meaning 1) "cool", "awesome", "nice". 2) Sometimes it can be used to confirm something and also 3) to say that someone is good-looking.

1) "¿Cómo estuvo tu fin de semana?" "¡Estuvo chévere!" 2) "¿Qué te parece si vamos a comer?" "¡Chévere!" 3) "Ese hombre está chévere."

1) "How was your weekend?" "It was nice!" 2) "How about we go eat something?" "Sure!" 3) "That man is hot."

Confirmed by 6 people

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Spanish Venezuela

Épale

Word USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(interj.) • It's a way to say hey or hi.

"¡Épale! ¿Cómo estás?" "¡Épale Andrés! ¿Cómo estuvo tu fin de semana?"

"Hi! How are you?" "Hey Andres! How was your weekend?"

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Venezuela

pana

Word USED Very frequently BY From Gen X until Z

It's another way to say 1) friend or 2) friendly. Also can use like 3) "dude".

1) "Carlos es mi pana." 2) "Carlos es pana." 3) "Oye pana, ¿qué hora es?"

1) "Carlos is my friend." 2) "Carlos is friendly." 3) "Hey dude, what time is it?"

Confirmed by 4 people

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Spanish Argentina

el día del arquero

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(the goalkeeper’s day) • Used when something is unlikely or that will happen in a very long time.

“Si no estudiás, te vas a recibir el día del arquero.”

“If you don’t study, you’re gonna graduate on the goalkeeper’s day”

Confirmed by 5 people

Spanish El Salvador

ya vino Elver

Idiom USED Very frequently BY Young People

(Elver came) • Used when it starts raining heavily. Elver is short for "el vergazo de agua", which literally translates to "the water's big cock".

"¡Entrá que ya vino Elver!"

"Get inside because Elver came!"

Spanish El Salvador

me cayó el veinte

Idiom USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(the twenty fell on me) • It is a way of saying you realized or remembered something.

"Iba a traer a María al colegio, pero después me cayó el veinte de que se iba a quedar en casa de Julia."

"I was going to pick up Maria from school, but then the twenty fell on me that she was staying over Julia's house."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Spanish Argentina

Llueve a cántaros

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(It's raining in jugs) • It means that it's raining as heavy as if it's pouring from a vase.

¡Mira como está lloviendo a cántaros!

Look how it's raining in jugs!

Confirmed by 7 people

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Spanish Argentina

Caen soretes de punta

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Older Generations

(Turds are falling on our heads) • Used to say that it is raining very heavily or it is pouring.

"Se largó a llover mal. Están cayendo soretes de punta."

"It started raining very heavily. Turds are falling on our heads."

Confirmed by 4 people

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Spanish Argentina

¡Chocolate por la noticia!

Expression USED Very frequently BY Adults

(Chocolate for the news!) • When someone makes an announcement thinking that it's new information, but it isn't.

"Resulta que Laura está saliendo con Marcos." "¡Chocolate por la noticia!"

"Turns out Laura is dating Marcos." "Chocolate for the news!"

Confirmed by 7 people

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Spanish Caracas, Venezuela

Está cayendo un palo de agua

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(A stick of water is falling) • It is used to say that it's raining a lot.

"¡Por acá está cayendo un palo de agua!"

"Over here, a stick of water is falling!"

Confirmed by 4 people