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French France

cul-sec

Word USED Very frequently BY Students

(dry ass) • Equivalent to "bottoms-up" or "chug". To drink a glass of alcohol in a single shot.

"Il a bu sa bière cul-sec."

"He chugged his beer."

Confirmed by 12 people

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French France

pompes

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • (pumps) • Equivalent of "shoes" or "creps".

"J'ai acheté des nouvelles pompes pour courir."

"I bought new shoes to go running."

Confirmed by 10 people

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French France

la gueule de bois

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(n.) • (wooden face) • Hangover.

"J'ai la gueule de bois. J'ai trop bu hier."

"I have the wooden face. I drank too much yesterday."

Confirmed by 12 people

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French France

se bourrer la gueule

Expression USED Very frequently BY Students

To get shitfaced.

"On s'est bourré la gueule hier, on s'est tous réveillé avec la gueule de bois."

"We got shitfaced yesterday and woke up with a hangover."

Confirmed by 7 people

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French France

ptdr

Abbreviation USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

(broken from laughter) • Equivalent to "lmao" and "lol". Can also mean "I can't anymore" if something is too funny or you are making fun of it. To emphasise the word, add more R.

"Il s'est grave tapé la honte ptdr"

"He made a fool of himself lmao"

Confirmed by 13 people

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French Lyon, France

vago

Word USED Very frequently BY Students

(n.) • Slang term for "car".

"Ma vago est tombée en panne hier."

"My car broke down yesterday."

Confirmed by 5 people

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French France

stylé

Word USED Very frequently BY Students

Something or someone cool and trendy.

"Hyper stylé le nouvel iPhone!"

"The new iPhone is so cool!"

Confirmed by 11 people

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French Area around Lyon, France

gros

Name USED Very frequently BY young adults

(a big person) • Slang term for "mate", "dude" or "bro".

"Gros t'as pas vu mes clefs?"

"Mate did you find my keys?"

Confirmed by 10 people

French France

mytho

Slang USED Very frequently BY Most People

(adj.) • Used to describe someone who lies, often to make themselves sounds better. Abbreviation of 'mythomane'.

"Ne l’écoute pas, il est gros mytho."

"Don't listen to him, he's a complete liar."

French France

bouffer

Slang USED Very frequently BY Most People

(v.) • To eat.

"Viens, on va chercher à bouffer."

"Come on, let's find something to eat."

French France

défoncé

Slang USED Very frequently BY Young People

(adj.) • Used to mean wasted or out of it, after having consumed alcohol or drugs.

"Tu te souviens de la soirée?" "Pas du tout, j'étais complètement défoncé."

"Do you remember the party?" "Not at all, I was completely wasted."

French France

une taffe

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • A drag of a cigarette.

"Je peux te prendre une taffe?"

"Can I have a drag?"

French France

La vache!

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) • (The cow!) • An expression of surprise, admiration, or disappointment.

"Ah la vache! On s’est fait écraser par le PSG à nouveau."

"Oh damn, we got crushed by PSG (Paris Saint-Germain) again."

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French France

poser un lapin

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(to put down a rabbit) • To stand someone up.

"Pourquoi tu pleures?" "Il m'a posé un lapin."

"Why are you crying?" "He put me down a rabbit."

French France

un troquet

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

A local cafe or bar. Often a relaxed and informal place.

"Je pris un café au troquet."

"I had a coffee at the local cafe."

French France

avoir un coeur d'artichaut

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to have an artichoke's heart) • To fall in love easily and often.

"Il nous a raconté les peines de son coeur d'artichaut."

"He told us about his many failed romances."

French Mostly in the city of Toulouse, France

chocolatine

Name USED Very frequently BY People from the West part of France

(n.) • It's a synonym of 'pain au chocolat', a French pastry.

"Bonjour, je voudrais une chocolatine s'il-vous-plaît."

"Hello, I would like a chocolatine, please."

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French Eastern regions, France

nareux

Word USED Frequently BY Some People

(adj.) • "Être nareux" or "nareuse" means that you can't use something, like a glass, a bottle, or a spoon, after someone else. It's mostly used by people from the eastern regions of France.

"Si tu n'es pas nareux tu peux boire dans ma bouteille"

"If you are not nareux you can drink in my bottle"

French France

Pierre qui roule n'amasse pas mousse

Expression USED On Occasion BY Most People

(A rolling stone gathers no moss) • Meaning that an adventurous life does not allow you to get materially rich. It comes from the facts that rocks gather moss in the forest.

"Il faut vraiment trouver un travail. Pierre qui roule n'amasse pas mousse."

"You really need to get a job. A rolling stone gathers no moss."

French France

Je suis en susu

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young people

"Je suis en susu" is the abbrevation for "sueur" meaning sweating.

“Je stresse tellement, je suis en susu.“

“I'm so anxious, I'm sweating.”