Spanish Spain

estar hasta las narices

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(to be up the nose) • It refers to when you are fed up or sick to death of something.

“Estoy hasta las narices de este trabajo.”

“I’m up the nose with this job.”

Confirmed by 2 people

Spanish Andalusia, Spain

cagarse en todo lo que se menea

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to shit on everything that wiggles) • An expression of frustration.

"He perdido el tren, ¡me cago en todo lo que se menea!"

"I missed the train, I'm shitting on everything that wiggles!"

Confirmed by 3 people

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Catalan | Catalunya Spain

estem arreglats

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(we are well dressed) • Expression used when you are on a trouble.

"Ens hem oblidat el passaport a casa i el vol surt en una hora, estem arreglades"

"We forgot the passport at home and our plane departs in one hour, we are well-dressed."

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Spain

estar más perdidx que un pulpo en un garaje

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to be more lost than an octopus in a garage) • To be lost. To not have a clue.

"No estudió nada. Durante el examen estaba más perdido que un pulpo en un garaje."

"He didn't study at all. He was lost more than an octopus in a garage during the exam."

Spanish Spain

papafrita

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(french fry) • Someone dumb, foolish or of little intelligent.

"Fastidió la fiesta sorpresa, se lo contó todo a la cumpleañera. Menudo papafrita".

"He screwed up the surprise party, he told everything to the birthday girl. What a french fry."

Spanish Andalusia, Spain

tajá

Expression USED Frequently BY Some People

A slice, usually of fruit.

"Tengo hambre, ¿me das una tajá de melón?"

"I'm hungry, can you give me a slice of melon?"

Spanish Spain

sobremesa

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(on the table) • Time spent sitting at the table after lunch chatting or watching TV (usually drinking coffee).

"Entresemana no tengo tiempo, como y voy a trabajar. Por eso, los domingos disfruto de las sobremesas con la familia."

"I have no time on week days I eat, and I go to work. For this reason, on Sundays I enjoy on the table with the family."

Spanish Spain

ser la leche

Expression USED Frequently BY Young People

(to be the milk ) • To be cool. It can be used for both people or things.

"¡Eres la leche!" "¡Este juego es la leche!"

"You are the milk!" "This game is the milk!"

Confirmed by 3 people

Spanish Spain

membrillo

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(quince) • Someone who is a bit stupid and naive.

"No seas membrillo."

"Don't be stupid."

Confirmed by 2 people

Catalan | Mallorquí Mallorca, Spain

mos deim coses

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(we tell each other things) • It should mean "we'll be in touch", but when a Mallorcan person says it you may never see them again. It is quite common that they will never call you or you will never know anything about them since then.

“Vols anar a prendre un cafè la setmana que ve?”. “Sí, mos deim coses”.

“Do you want to grab a coffee next week?” “Yes, we tell each other things.”

Catalan | Mallorquí Mallorca, Spain

mesclar ous amb caragols

Expression USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(mix eggs and snails ) • It doesn’t refer to a recipe - we use it during a conversation when many differents subjects are being mixed together and have no correlation to each other.

“Què dius ara? No mesclis ous amb caragols!”

“What are you talking about? Don’t mix eggs and snails!”

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Spanish Valencian Country, Spain

pateo

Word USED Frequently BY People Under 30

(n.) • (long walk) • Action that requires an effort that we do not want to undertake. Not necessarily linked to walking despite its original sense.

"Dios, aún me quedan veinte páginas, ¡qué pateo!"

"God, there's still twenty more pages, what a long walk!"

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Spanish Spain

el burro delante, pa que no se espante

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(the donkey goes first, so it doesn't get scared) • In Spanish, it is usually considered impolite to refer to oneself while listing the members of some group before every other person has been mentioned. This expression is used to make someone aware of his misplacement of the first-person pronoun in an enumeration that includes more people.

"¿Y quiénes fuisteis al cine?" "Fuimos yo, Joan y Pablo." "El burro delante, pa que no se espante."

"And who went to the cinema?" "Me, Joan and Pablo." "The donkey goes in front, so it doesn't get scared."

Confirmed by 3 people

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Spanish Spain

el día que las ranas críen pelo

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(the day that frogs grow up hair) • A different way to say that something would never happen or a strong no to a question.

"¿Vienes conmigo al partido?" "¡Iré contigo el día que las ranas críen pelo!"

"Would you come with me to the match?" "I will go with you the day that frogs grow up hair!"

Spanish Palencia, Spain

banzo

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(n.) • (step) • Word used instead of the Spanish word for 'step'.

"¡Cuidado con el banzo!"

"Be careful with the step!"

Spanish Spain

cambiar el agua al canario

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(change the water to the canary) • Used when someone needs to go to the toilet.

"Ahora vuelvo, tengo que cambiarle el agua al canario"

"I'll be right back, I have to change the water to the canary."

Confirmed by 2 people

Spanish Spain

calderilla

Word USED Frequently BY Most People

(n.) • (small heater) • All the cent coins that are kept in the wallet.

"Siento pagarte con calderilla, pero es todo lo que tengo en este momento."

"I'm sorry for paying with a little heater, but it's all I have right now."

Spanish Spain

poner la mano en el fuego

Expression USED On Rare Occasion BY Adults

(to put a hand in the fire) • Used to say that you believe in someone or something so strongly that you would put your hand in a fire and you wouldn't burn yourself.

"Pondría mi mano en el fuego por él y sé que no me quemaría."

"I would put my hand on a fire for him and I'm sure I wouldn't burn myself."

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Galician Galicia, Spain

riquiño

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

(adj.) • (little rich) • It is commonly translated as cute, but it can also mean anything from nice to adorable.

“Hoxe vou quedar co meu amigo Xácome. Coñecelo?" "Xácome? Si oh, é moi riquiño!”

"I’m meeting my friend Xácome today, do you know him?" "Xácome? Yes, he’s so little rich!"

Spanish Spain

dar calabazas

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Teens

(to give pumpkins) • It means to turn someone down and reject them, for example when they're flirting with you.

"Le pedí a María de salir conmigo a la fiesta pero me dio calabazas."

"I asked Maria to go to the party with me but she gave me pumpkins."

Confirmed by 4 people