il marchese*

* the marquis

Italian Tuscany, especially in Florence and Livorno, Italy

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Used to indicate menstruation in some parts of Tuscany. It is actually "the red marquis", literally "the marquis dressed in red". It is used with the metaphor of a visit.

"Non mi va di andare a nuotare oggi, c'ho il marchese." "Il marchese doveva venire già da un po', mi inizio a preoccupare."

"Sorry I don't feel like swimming today, I have the marquis." "The marquis was supposed to visit but he didn't, I'm starting to worry."





ho le mie cose*

* I have my things

Italian Italy

Expression USED Very frequently BY Women

It litterally means 'I have my things' and it refers to the menstrual period.

"Lasciami stare che ho le mie cose."

"Let me be, I have my things."


Confirmed by 2 people




fuori come un balcone*

* out like a balcony

Italian Italy

Slang USED Frequently BY Teens

Used to say that someone is out of their mind. It can refer both to something said or done by that person.

"Marco ama solo gli sport estremi, è fuori come un balcone."

"Marco only loves extreme sports, he's out like a balcony."


Confirmed by 2 people




Sputa il rospo*

* spit the toad

Italian Italy

Idiom USED Very frequently BY Almost Everyone

To urge someone to speak their mind or tell about something with no restraints; to spill the beans.

"Non hai mai espresso il tuo parere sulla loro unione. Forza, sputa il rospo."

"You have never expressed your opinion on their engagement. Come on, spit the toad."


Confirmed by 2 people




sviolinata*

* violin refrain

Italian Italy

Word USED Frequently BY Some People

Flattery; adulatory compliment.

"Luca sta esagerando con i complimenti. Mi sembrano solo delle sviolinate per ottenere qualcosa."

"Luca is praising me a bit too much. His compliments are mere violin refrains to get something from me."


Confirmed by 2 people




alt

Sei scemo o mangi i sassi?*

* Are you stupid or do you eat stones?

Italian Italy

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

Rhetorical question that implies someone is really stupid. After all, eating stones is not the smartest thing to do, is it?

"Sara mi ha detto che vuoi andare in Antartide da solo. Sei scemo o mangi i sassi?"

"Sara told me you want to go to the Antarctic alone. Are you stupid or do you eat stones?"


Confirmed by 4 people




coda di paglia*

* straw-made tail

Italian Italy

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

Used when someone is upset for not having a clear conscience and is scared to be exposed.

"Non ho mangiato io i biscotti!" "Non ti ho accusato, hai la coda di paglia?"

"I didn't eat the cookies!" "I didn't blame you, do you have a straw-made tail?"


Confirmed by 4 people




avere le pezze al culo*

* to have patches on your ass

Italian Italy

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

To be so poor that you don't have any money to buy new clothes, so you wear your old and worn-out clothes; to be dirt poor.

"Andare in vacanza non è la mia priorità in questo momento. Ho perso il lavoro e quindi adesso ho le pezze al culo."

"Going on holiday is not my top priority right now. I have lost my job and so now I have patches on my ass."


Confirmed by 4 people




oca*

* goose

Italian Italy

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

Said of a girl who acts silly, speaks with a high pitch of voice, laughs too much and talks about frivolous topics.

Note: It can be reinforced using "oca giuliva" (joyful goose) or "oca giuliva e padovana" (joyful goose from Padua).

"Hai visto Anna com'è cambiata? È diventata un'oca."

"Have you seen how Anna's changed? She's become a goose."


Confirmed by 2 people




avere un piede nella fossa*

* to have a foot in the grave

Italian Italy

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Everyone

To kick the bucket; used to say that someone has little time left to live.

"Il mio vicino ha 85 anni, ha praticamente un piede nella fossa."

"My neighbor is 85, he basically has a foot in the grave."


Confirmed by 2 people




né carne né pesce*

* neither meat nor fish

Italian Italy

Idiom USED Frequently BY Everyone

Used to say that someone has no personality.

"Marco non prende mai posizione, non è né carne né pesce."

"Marco never takes sides, he is neither meat nor fish."


Confirmed by 2 people




fuori di melone*

* out of melon

Italian Italy

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

To be out of your mind; the melon here is used as a reference to a person's head.

"Lisa, perché vai in giro da sola di notte, sei fuori di melone?"

"Lisa, why are you walking alone at night, are you out of melon?"


Confirmed by 2 people




fare il passo più lungo della gamba*

* to take a step longer than your leg

Italian Italy

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

Used to say that someone should take it slow instead of doing things that are out of their league.

"Ci vuole tempo per raggiungere quell'obiettivo: non fare il passo più lungo della gamba."

"It takes time to achieve that goal - don't take a step longer than your leg."


Confirmed by 2 people




non avere fegato*

* to not have liver

Italian Italy

Idiom USED Frequently BY Everyone

This expression is used when someone shows fear and it simply means to be afraid of something.

"Martina non si tufferebbe mai da quella roccia: non ha fegato!" "Ci vuole fegato per tuffarsi da quella roccia!"

"Martina would never dive from that rock: she has no liver! "It takes liver to dive from that rock!"


Confirmed by 2 people




rigirare la frittata*

* to flip the omelette

Italian Italy

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

Used when who is guilty of something tries to push accusations back on who is accusing them.

"Mi hai tradito!" "Solo perché tu non mi davi attenzioni!" "Non rigirare la frittata, è colpa tua!"

"You cheated on me!" "Just because you weren't giving me attention!" "Don't flip the omelette, it's your fault!"


Confirmed by 2 people