Welsh Wales

Cofiwch Dryweryn

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(Remember Tryweryn) • 'Cofiwch Dryweryn' is the phrase used to bring attention to the drowning of the Welsh town Capel Celyn in 1965. The act of the town being turned into a water reservoir for the English city of Liverpool forms a large part of the animosity between the two countries.

"Yn y dyfodol, mae'r Saesneg wedi achosi llawer o gur am Gymru." "Dw i'n cytuno gyda ti - cofiwch Dryweryn!"

"In the past, the English have caused a lot of pain for Wales." "I agree with you - remember Tryweryn!"

ety

æ

Welsh Wales

grêt

Word USED Frequently BY Young People

(adj.) • Great

"Sut roedd y parti? Roedd hi'n grêt!"

"How was the party? It was great!"

Confirmed by 2 people

syn

Welsh Wales

cerdded yn ling di long

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to walk in a ling di long) • To loiter, to walk slowly or casually

"Ble mae Gruffudd?" "Mae e’n cerdded yn ling di long."

"Where’s Gruffudd?" "He is taking a slow walk,"

syn

alt

Welsh Wales

dim ffiars o beryg

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(no fear of danger) • Used to say that you’re unlikely to do something.

"Doedd dim ffiars o beryg i mi fynd yn ôl."

"There was no fear of danger to me of going back"

syn

Welsh Wales

paid â chodi pais ar ôl piso

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(don’t raise your petticoat after pissing) • Don’t spend time worrying about something that cannot be changed.

"Dylet ti wedi dod â siorts neu paid â chodi pais ar ôl piso."

"You should have come with shorts but don’t raise your petticoat after pissing."

syn

alt

æ

Welsh Wales

cŵl

Word USED Frequently BY Young People

(adj.) • Cool.

"Mae Cymraeg yn iaith cŵl iawn."

"Welsh is a very cool language."

Confirmed by 2 people

syn

æ

Welsh Wales

shwmae

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Most People

(interj.) • A casual greeting

“Shwmae Rhys.” “Shwmae Siân.“

“Hey Rhys.” “Hey Siân.”

Confirmed by 3 people

alt

Welsh Wales

paid â mynd o flaen gofid

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(don’t go ahead of fear) • Used in response to someone looking for difficulties in a situation where they may not even be any, causing them to worry for nothing.

"Mae Cymraeg ddim yn rhy anodd - dylet ti ei dysgu. Paid â mynd o flaen gofid."

"Welsh is not too difficult - you should learn it. Don’t go ahead of fear."

syn

alt

Welsh Wales

paned

Word USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(n.) • A cup of tea or coffee.

"Wyt ti’n eisiau paned?"

"Do you want some tea/coffee?"

alt

Welsh Wales

rhoi’r ffidl yn y tô

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(to put the violin in the roof) • Used to say “To give up” - equivalent to the English “To throw the towel in”

"Roedd e’n dysgu Cymraeg ond mae e wedi rhoi’r ffidl yn y tô."

"He was learning Welsh but he has put the violin in the roof."

Welsh Wales

cer i grafu

Slang USED Frequently BY Young People

(go and scratch) • A way of telling someone to 'fuck off'.

"Wyt ti eisiau mynd i'r siopa heddiw?" "Cer i grafu!"

"Do you want to go to the shops today?" "Go and scratch!"

Welsh Wales

pan ddaw môr i ben y mynydd

Expression USED Frequently BY Everyone

(when the sea comes to the mountain top) • Used to say that something will almost certainly not happen.

“Pryd fydd Dylan ac Eleri priodi?” “Pan ddaw môr i ben y mynydd.”

“When will Dylan and Eleri get married?” “When the sea comes to the mountain top.”