Spanish Spain

🙈

Emoji USED Very frequently BY Teenage Girls

It means something is very cute. The word for that is "mono", which happens to have "monkey" as its first meaning, hence the emoji.

"Te he comprado chuches." "Ayyy 🙈"

"I bought you candy." "Awww 🙈"

Confirmed by 6 people

Spanish Chile

bacán

Slang USED Very frequently BY Everyone

It is used to say something is cool.

"Oh, que bacán."

"Oh, how cool."

Spanish Spain

ni Periscope ni hostias

Reference USED On Occasion BY Teens

(neither Periscope nor hosts) • Reference to a video gone viral in 2016 in which a mom catches her daughter using Periscope, a livestreaming platform, and starts scolding her without turning the camera off so that the whole audience was able to witness the scene. Currently used to mean that someone shouldn't find an excuse for their bad behavior.

"Ni Periscope ni hostias, quemadísima me tienes."

"Neither Periscope nor hosts, you have me furious."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Spanish Argentina

flaco

Word USED Very frequently BY Everyone

(adj.) • (thin) • We use "flaco" instead of saying "you" when addressing someone.

"Che flaco, fijate antes de cruzar."

"Hey thin, watch before crossing."

Confirmed by 11 people

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Spanish Dominican Republic

tiguere

Slang USED Very frequently BY Friends/ acquaintances

(adj.) • The word “tiguere” is used by Dominicans to describe a very astute or cunning person, someone who is skilled at manipulation or street smart. Also used as a greeting between friends

"Ese tipo es un tiguere."

"That dude is astute."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Romanian Romania

coaie

Interjection USED Frequently BY Teens

(n.) • (balls) • It is an interjection used when addressing friends in informal conversations.

"Ce faci, coaie?" "Foarte bine, coaie. Tu? "

"What's up, balls?" "All good, balls. What about you?"

Norwegian Norway

Tigerstaden

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(tiger city) • A nickname for the city of Oslo. In his poem 'Sidste sang' (Last Song), poet Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson wrote about a fight between a horse and a tiger, where the horse represented the countryside, and the tiger represented Oslo. It was meant as a condescending metaphor for the city being dangerous, depleting, and hostile place, but today the name is often used positively.

"Ser ut som om det blir fint vær i Tigerstaden i dag."

"Looks like the weather will be nice in the capital today."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

oi

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

'Oi' or 'åj' is exclamation expressing surprise both negative and positive. Can be used as an equivalent to 'oops' or 'wow'.

"Oi, så fint det var her!" "Oi, jeg har mistet mobilen!"

"Wow, this is place is nice!" "Oops, I lost my phone!"

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

kakeskive

Word USED On Occasion BY Older Generations

(cake piece) • A piece of or slice of bread.

"Kom inn og få deg ei kakeskive."

"Come inside and have a cake piece."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

Jøss!

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Some People

Exclamation expressing dismay or surprise.

"Jøss! Er det virkelig deg?"

'Wow! Is it really you?'

Confirmed by 2 people

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German German speaking countries

nicht alle Tassen im Schrank haben

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to not have all the cups in the cupboard) • To be crazy.

"Du willst trotz des Sturms schwimmen gehen? Du hast doch nicht alle Tassen im Schrank!"

"You want to go swimming despite the storm? You must not have all the cups in the cupboard!"

Confirmed by 10 people

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Norwegian Norway

Å skjære alle over én kam

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

(To cut everyone with the same comb) • To judge, evalue or treat all people in a group the same way without taking any (individual) differences into account.

"Svensker er ubrukelige til å gå på ski." "Nå må du ikke skjære alle over én kam."

"Swedes are useless at skiing." "You shouldn't cut everyone with the same comb."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

sa brura

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Most People

(said the bride) • The Norwegian equivalent of "that's what she said".

"Jøss, den var større enn jeg trodde." "Sa brura!"

"Wow, it's bigger than I thought." "Said the bride!"

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

våt som ei katte

Expression USED On Occasion BY Almost Everyone

(wet like a cat) • Being soaking wet.

"Han kom inn våt som ei katte."

"He came in wet like a cat."

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Norwegian Norway

(helt) konge

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young People

(adj.) • ((completely) king) • Great, very good, the best of the best.

"Han er helt konge på gitar!"

"He's completely king at playing the guitar!"

Confirmed by 2 people

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German German speaking countries

Holla, die Waldfee!

Idiom USED On Very Rare Occasion BY Some People

("Holla, the forest fairy!") • Can be used to express a state of surprise or shock. However, it is very rarely used in a serious way because of its rather funny wording.

"Dein neues Auto sieht ja richtig schick aus! Aber der Preis... Holla, die Waldfee!"

"Your new car looks really nice! But the price... Holla, the forest fairy!"

Confirmed by 6 people

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Norwegian Norway

kjip

Word USED On Occasion BY Young People

Something stupid, sad, boring, unpleasant, or petty. Can be used for objects, situations, or people.

"Jeg synes de var kjipe som ikke inviterte oss på festen." "Ja, det er kjipt å sitte her hjemme alene."

"I think it was petty of them not to invite us to the party." "Yes, it's boring sitting at home alone."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

utepils

Expression USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(adj.) • (outside-pilsner) • A beer (often pilsner) that one drinks outside; often in an establishment that serves beer, but could also be on someone's porch, on a boat, or another public place as long as it is outside. The 'first' utepils is sometimes a highlight for many Norwegians, as it represents the transition from winter into summer when one can finally sit outside in the sun and drink beer again after a long, cold winter.

"Det blir deilig å snart kunne ta den første utepilsen."

"It'll be great to get to have the first outside-pilsner."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

morrabrød

Expression USED On Occasion BY Young People

(n.) • (morning bread) • Expression meaning waking up with an erection.

"Han våknet opp på sofaen med morrabrød."

"He woke up on the sofa with a morning bread."

Confirmed by 2 people

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Norwegian Norway

(å) gidde

Word USED Frequently BY Everyone

Not wanting to bother with something, either because of laziness or because it's uninteresting or boring to do. If asked to 'gidde' to do something, the speaker often asks if the listener would care to do something, even if the activity might be boring.

"Gidder du å ta ut av oppvaskmaskinen?" "Nei, det gidder jeg ikke."

"Would you care to empty the dishwasher?" "No, I don't care to do that."

Confirmed by 2 people