English English speaking countries

in a pickle

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

Means that you are in a difficult position with no easy solution.

"I'm in a bit of a pickle - the deadline is tomorrow and my computer just broke."

German Germany

Geborgenheit

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Used to describe a deep sense of security and comfort. It is the feeling that everything is exactly how it should be, such as snuggling up with a loved one or eating home-cooked food when returning to your childhood home.

"Meine Kinder genießen die Geborgenheit einer liebevollen Familie."

"My children enjoy the comfort of a loving family."

German Germany

jein

Portmanteau USED Frequently BY Some People

(yesno) • A contraction of the words "ja" (yes) and "nein" (no). It means that you agree to what has being said, but that you disagree about one aspect that has been mentioned or that you restrict your affirmation.

"Kann ich mir dein Auto ausleihen?" "Jein, höchstens für die nächste halbe Stunde. Dann brauche ich es selber."

"Can I borrow your car?" "Yes, but only for the next half hour. Then I need it myself."

Dutch Netherlands

boekdelen spreken

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to speak bookparts) • Used when something says a lot or is very obvious, usually without actually speaking.

“Hij zei niks maar zijn gezicht sprak boekdelen.”

“He didn’t say anything but his face spoke bookparts.”

Confirmed by 3 people

æ

Dutch Netherlands

langdradig

Word USED On Occasion BY Some People

(adj.) • (longthreadish) • Used for stories that are too long.

“Wat vond je van m’n essay?” “Ik vond het een beetje langdradig.”

“What did you think of my essay?” “I thought it was a little longthreadish.”

Confirmed by 3 people

Dutch Netherlands

lang van stof

Idiom USED On Occasion BY Some People

(long of fabric) • Used for someone who speaks about something elaborately and for a long time.

“Ik wou even kort bij opa langs, maar ja, je weet dat hij altijd wat lang van stof is.”

“I wanted to make a short stop at grandpa’s, but well, he’s always quite long of fabric.”

Confirmed by 2 people

French France

avoir la dalle

Standard Phrase USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To be very hungry.

"Je commence à avoir la dalle."

"I'm starting to get hungry."

English United Kingdom

to have your head screwed on

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

To think or act in a smart and sensible way.

"What do you think of the new girl?" "She's good, she's got her head screwed on."

Malay Malaysia

#DudukRumah

Hashtag USED In the past BY Some People

A hashtag created during the COVID-19 crisis to encourage people to stay at home.

"Day 40 #DudukRumah"

"Day 40 #StayAtHome"

Confirmed by 2 people

syn

Dutch Netherlands

krijg nou wat

Expression USED On Occasion BY Some People

(get something now) • Used to express surprise, similar to the English “what the hell?”

“Krijg nou wat, dit heb ik nog nooit eerder gezien”

“Get something now, I’ve never seen this before”

Confirmed by 2 people

alt

Swedish Sweden

en nollåtta

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • (a zero-eight) • A sometimes derogatory term for a person from Stockholm, derived from Stockholm's area code, 08.

"Den där nollåttan kan inte köra!"

"That Stockholmer can't drive!"

Confirmed by 4 people

English United Kingdom

skive

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To play truant, meaning to not go in to work or school when you are supposed to.

"Let's skive maths this afternoon, I haven't done the homework."

English United Kingdom

quid

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(n.) • The British pound.

"Can you lend me two quid for some chewing gum?"

English Northern England, United Kingdom

baccy

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • Shortened word for 'tobacco'.

"I'm rolling a cigarette, can I use your baccy?"

syn

English Northern England, United Kingdom

How do?

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

Greeting often used between walkers as they pass each other on a hike. It doesn't really mean anything but it an expression of friendliness that does not require an actual answer.

"How do?" "How do?"

syn

English United Kingdom

bagsy

Slang USED Frequently BY Some People

(v.) • To claim something for yourself, reserving it so someone else can't take it.

"Bagsy front seat!" "Don't take the last slice of cake, I've bagsy'd it."

alt

Scots Scotland

thunder-plump

Word USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • A sudden, thundery shower of rain.

"It's awfie dreich the day, a reckon we're in fer an unco big thunder-plump!"

"It's awfully grey today, I reckon there's a very big thunder-plump coming!"

English Northern England & Scotland, United Kingdom

lass

Slang USED On Occasion BY Some People

(n.) • A girl or young woman.

"Check out that lass over there."

English Northern England, United Kingdom

cuppa

Word USED Very frequently BY Some People

(n.) • A cup of tea. Contraction of the phrase "cup of".

"Want a cuppa?" "Ok, go on then."

French France

avoir un coeur d'artichaut

Standard Phrase USED On Occasion BY Some People

(to have an artichoke's heart) • To fall in love easily and often.

"Il nous a raconté les peines de son coeur d'artichaut."

"He told us about his many failed romances."