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ope

English Midwest, United States

Interjection USED Frequently BY Almost Everyone

(interj.) Interjection used to indicate surprise and/or mild disappointment. Frequently followed by the word “well.”

“Ope, well, guess we can’t see the movie anymore” *gets bumped into by someone* “ope, watch yourself!“ “Ope, well, then I guess I don’t know, then”





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per carità!*

* for charity!

Italian Italy and Switzerland

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

Generally at the end of the sentence to stress that something is negative. Equivalent to "God forbid" or "hell no".

"Giovanna, ma ti piace Marco o no?" "Ma per carità!"

"Giovanna, do you or do you not like Marco?" "For God‘s sake, no!"


Confirmed by 3 people




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madonna

Italian Italy

Interjection USED Frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) Interjection to express emphasis, surprise, shock, anger, excitement, etc. It can mean anything depending on the context.

"Guarda come si è vestita sexy stasera." "Madonna!" "Si è mangiato tre kebab." "Madonna!"

"Look how sexy she's dressed tonight!" "Madonna!" "He has eaten 3 kebabs!" "Madonna!"


Confirmed by 4 people




voilà voilà

French French speaking countries

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Most People

When you finish telling something that might be awkward, sad or another quite negative feeling, you often end the story with "voilà voilà". The use and tone is different from the enthusiastic "voilà!".

"Hier, je marchais dans la rue tout en buvant mon café, et j'ai glissé sur une peau de banane. Je suis tombé et j'ai renversé mon café très chaud sur moi. Malheureusement, la rue était bondée, donc tout le monde m'a vu tomber. Voilà voilà..."

"Yesterday, I was walking down the street while drinking my coffee, and I slipped on a banana peel. I fell and spilled my very hot coffee on myself. Unfortunately, the street was crowded, so everyone saw me falling. So there you go..."


Confirmed by 7 people




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servus

German | Austrian Austria

Interjection USED Frequently BY Most People

(interj.) It is a way of saying hello and/or bye that's only used in informal settings (e.g. with friends or family).

"Servus! Wie geht's? Lange nicht mehr gesehen!"

"Hi! How are you? Long time no see!"


Confirmed by 3 people




guzik prawda!*

* button truth

Polish Poland

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Most People

An expression used when the speaker strongly disagrees with a statement.

"Pieniądze szczęścia nie dają." "Guzik prawda!"

"Money can't buy happiness." "Button truth!"


Confirmed by 2 people




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Kladderadatsch *

* crash bang wallop

German Germany

Interjection USED On Rare Occasion BY Some People

(n.) A mess or some undefined collection of stuff.

"Ich habe heute mein Auto aufgeräumt und den ganzen Kladderadatsch, der da drin war endlich mal weggeschmissen."

"I tidied up my car today and finally threw away all the Kladderadatsch that was in there."


Confirmed by 6 people




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coaie*

* balls

Romanian Romania

Interjection USED Frequently BY Teens

(n.) It is an interjection used when addressing friends in informal conversations.

"Ce faci, coaie?" "Foarte bine, coaie. Tu? "

"What's up, balls?" "All good, balls. What about you?"





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oi

Norwegian Norway

Interjection USED Very frequently BY Everyone

'Oi' or 'åj' is exclamation expressing surprise both negative and positive. Can be used as an equivalent to 'oops' or 'wow'.

"Oi, så fint det var her!" "Oi, jeg har mistet mobilen!"

"Wow, this is place is nice!" "Oops, I lost my phone!"


Confirmed by 2 people




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Jøss!

Norwegian Norway

Interjection USED On Occasion BY Some People

Exclamation expressing dismay or surprise.

"Jøss! Er det virkelig deg?"

'Wow! Is it really you?'


Confirmed by 2 people




mamma mia!*

* my mother!

Italian Italy

Interjection USED Frequently BY Everyone

(interj.) You say "mamma mia!" whenever you are surprised, scared, annoyed or happy.

"Sapevi che Anna ha sette figli?" "Mamma mia! Sono così tanti!"

"Did you know that Anna has seven children?" "My mother! They are so many!"


Confirmed by 12 people




wesh

French France

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

(interj.) Used to greet a friend or to draw attention.

"Wesh les potos. Bien ou bien ?"

"Hey guys. How ya doing?"


Confirmed by 3 people




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czołem!*

* forehead!

Polish Poland

Interjection USED Frequently BY Older Generations

(n.) Goodbye or greeting word.

"Muszę już iść. Czołem wszystkim!"

"I gotta go. Forehead everyone!"


Confirmed by 2 people




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csá

Hungarian Hungary

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

A way (usually young) people can say hello to someone.

"Csá haver, rég láttalak!"

"Hiya mate, haven't seen you for a while!"





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ndeah

Spanish Argentina

Interjection USED Frequently BY Young People

(interj.) Used to indicate sarcasm, exaggeration or just a joke.

"Estoy gordo porque estoy lleno de amor ndeah."

"I’m fat because I’m filled with love ndeah."


Confirmed by 5 people